Healthcare workforce statistics – MHWWB http://mhwwb.org/ Thu, 07 Oct 2021 06:27:52 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://mhwwb.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-34-150x150.png Healthcare workforce statistics – MHWWB http://mhwwb.org/ 32 32 How To Apply For A $1,000 Loan Right Now https://mhwwb.org/how-to-apply-for-a-1000-loan-right-now/ https://mhwwb.org/how-to-apply-for-a-1000-loan-right-now/#respond Thu, 07 Oct 2021 04:25:00 +0000 https://mhwwb.org/how-to-get-a-1000-loan-now-benzinga/ Small loans offer people the ability to finance their costs. However, these loans differ from larger loans because of their ease of access. It is not only easier to get the loans you need, however any of them need a great credit score (or any credit score whatsoever). The right loan will allow you to access funds immediately […]]]>

Small loans offer people the ability to finance their costs. However, these loans differ from larger loans because of their ease of access. It is not only easier to get the loans you need, however any of them need a great credit score (or any credit score whatsoever). The right loan will allow you to access funds immediately with low interest rates.

Can a $1,000 loan be considered as a payday loan?

The majority of $ 1,000 loans are financed with payday loans that are predatory payday loans. Although payday loans carry high interest rates, this doesn’t apply to all personal loans. Additionally, you don’t need to pay back the loan with the next payday. The loans, which are around $ 1,000, give you the option of repaying in 12 installments.

A lot of people get one thousand dollar payday loans so that they have the funds prior to payday. A steady job with a stable income provides employees with a steady option to quickly pay off their microloans.

Payday or personal loans can assist you in paying for any unexpected expenses and manage your the monthly costs. Microcredit can also help in credit card payment. It is possible to make payments on credit card debt by using another loan, but you will you will save money due to the low interest. A lot of people opt for debt consolidation to put their debts with a less interest cost, making them more affordable to pay over time. Personal loans can aid you in achieving this target.

GreendayOnline gives its members access to personal loans for small amounts that can be as high as $1,000 through their Credit Builder Plus membership program. The program offers numerous advantages and tools for financial gain that help users to improve or build their credit.

Additionally, Greendayonline members can get cash advances starting at zero percent APR to $250. If you pay back the loan in time, you will save yourself interest charges.

Could a $1,000 loan help you rebuild your credit?

The payment history is responsible for 35 percent of the creditworthiness. Repaying the personal loan can build the credit history and boost your score. When you repay a loan, it will boost your credit score as well, microloans are plentiful and easy to get.

As we mentioned previously, Greendayonline offers Credit Builder loans to help its customers build credit. The loans let members finance their costs while building their credit through the development of credit history that is positive. This Greendayonline Credit Builder program allows applicants to apply for 1,000 credit without having to submit strict credit checks. The repayments are spread out over 12 months . The program also gives members the option of scheduling auto-repayments for loans so that they don’t miss a payment.

Consumers who have no credit history may be eligible for the credit builder loan through Greendayonline to help improve the credit score. This is a great way for more individuals to increase their creditworthiness. The ability to improve your creditworthiness is crucial for your financial future because it will open the doorway to higher interest rates, and deals on auto loans, mortgages and other financial services. Traditional banks will heavily rely on your credit score to decide the amount they’ll loan to you.

Are cash advances readily available?

Consumers are able to withdraw cash advances using the debit or credit cards. While cash advances don’t pose as an obstacle to obtain however they do come with higher rate of interest. Be sure to not consider these advances until you’ve exhausted all other alternatives. Instacash permits you to take out up to $ 250 with zero percent APR. This is quite a contrast to credit cash advances from credit cards that typically surpass 20 percent APR.

The higher interest rates can affect your financial stability and can hinder your efforts to build credit. Achieving lower interest rates through more research can aid you in repaying your personal loan in a short time.

There are also possibilities to side hustle to increase the cash reserve. Upwork is an excellent source for finding remote jobs that can cover costs. You can also earn money through rider share apps such as Above and Lyft to earn extra income. Instacart and DoorDash provide similar options to side hustlers who prefer having food delivered instead of riding from one place to another as passengers.

Many people take advantage of multiple side jobs to earn money from time to time. This additional income can help pay your bills on time and also provides security in your finances. You may also make use of profits from side hustles to speed up the complete payment of the personal loan.

How do you make use of the loan of $1,000?

When you’ve obtained the micro-loan of $1,000 The money can be utilized in many ways. Small loans are often used to pay for daily purchases like food items and mortgage payment. A few people make use of the funds to pay for travel expenses. A further $1,000 could be an extra cost between the weekend getaway rental or a week-long holiday.

A few people stay clear of credit cards, yet when times get tough the personal loan can be advantageous. The funds from a micro loan could be used to cover medical costs or other emergency expenses. Instead of putting off help or waiting for help to arrive,

Take advantage of your personal loan

However, you shouldn’t apply for an individual loan solely to make a profit These loans can assist you in building credit and allow you immediate access to an additional source of income. There’s a chance that you won’t require an immediate personal loan however knowing where you can locate a personal loan can aid you in the event that you require one in the near future.

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Dearth of Credit Starves Detroit’s Housing Market https://mhwwb.org/dearth-of-credit-starves-detroits-housing-market/ https://mhwwb.org/dearth-of-credit-starves-detroits-housing-market/#respond Tue, 05 Oct 2021 07:35:03 +0000 https://mhwwb.org/?p=290 DETROIT—Alter Road runs northwest along this city’s border. To the east is Grosse Pointe Park, an upscale suburb dotted with grand old mansions built in the auto industry’s heyday. To the west is the city of Detroit, lined with abandoned houses and empty lots. On the east side of the street, getting a mortgage to […]]]>


DETROIT—Alter Road runs northwest along this city’s border. To the east is Grosse Pointe Park, an upscale suburb dotted with grand old mansions built in the auto industry’s heyday. To the west is the city of Detroit, lined with abandoned houses and empty lots.

On the east side of the street, getting a mortgage to buy a home is a breeze. On the west side, it is hardly worth trying.

Detroit is making a comeback after years of decline that led to a bankruptcy filing in 2013. But large swaths of the city are left behind, starved of the housing credit needed to revive them. No purchase mortgages were made last year in almost a third of Detroit’s census tracts, and fewer than five each in another third, according to data from LendingPatterns.com, a mortgage-data analysis tool.

The impact runs disproportionately along racial lines in the majority Black city. Detroit’s Black residents are largely shut out of access to financing, making it tougher to attain homeownership, the key to building wealth for most Americans.

Nonprofits, governments and corporations are trying to channel money back into the city’s neighborhoods. But making mortgages in Detroit is a convoluted task. The dearth of credit is largely a consequence of battered property values plus a commercial reality that depresses them further: Lenders can’t earn money on tiny mortgages, so they don’t make them.

Unfinanceable houses then go unsold, and their value sags still more. In Detroit, entire neighborhoods are trapped in this cycle of languishing property values and decay, their residents unable to access the tools needed to break it. The average home is worth roughly $400,000 in Grosse Pointe Park. Across Alter Road in Detroit, entire blocks could sell for less.

“Detroit is a hyperbolic example of the ways that systems can fail in terms of housing,” said

Laura Grannemann,

who oversees philanthropic work at the parent company of Quicken Loans Inc., which is the nation’s largest mortgage lender by dollar amount lent and is based in Detroit.

Less than a quarter of Detroit home sales were financed by mortgage loans last year, the smallest share in the 50 biggest U.S. cities, according to an analysis by Attom Data Solutions, a property-information provider.

For the city’s residents, it is a familiar story, now with a new dynamic. In neighborhoods where racist redlining policies once made it nearly impossible for Black Americans to get a mortgage, access to affordable credit and the wealth-building potential of homeownership remain elusive.

A view over Kercheval Avenue in Detroit.

The mortgages that are made inside Detroit’s borders go disproportionately to white borrowers. Whites, who make up less than 10% of the city’s population but often are concentrated in areas like downtown where investment in reviving property values, obtained 39% of mortgages last year. Black people make up roughly 80% of the population and got 51% of the city’s mortgages.

A failure to revitalize the city beyond its center is an obstacle to Detroit’s ambitious comeback plans. The money flowing toward reviving Detroit misses many of its neighborhoods, residents say. As a result, the city is home to fancy condo developments in some places and dilapidated houses in others.

“You can go down one block and it’s nice. You can go down the second block and they’re all vacant,” said

Linda Smith,

executive director of U-Snap-Bac, a nonprofit promoting economic growth on Detroit’s east side.

The problem is worsened by lenders tightening credit to deal with the economic fallout of the coronavirus pandemic, which has hit Black Americans especially hard. The dearth of mortgage credit pushes the city’s Black residents into a parallel universe of financing options that offer fewer protections than a traditional home loan.

Alicia Lurry

didn’t apply for a mortgage when she was ready to buy in 2018. Instead, she signed a seller-financed deal to purchase a three-bedroom brick house with a brown-and-yellow awning on the west side of Detroit for $35,000.

It wasn’t until she fell behind on payments that she learned she wasn’t actually buying the home. The contract she signed left her responsible for upkeep and property taxes, but she won’t get the deed until the final payment is made.

Alicia Lurry in front of her home on the west side of Detroit.

Black Americans have always struggled to access affordable credit in Detroit. Starting in the Depression era, maps of Detroit were awash in red lines singling out Black neighborhoods as risky places for lenders to make home loans.

By 1968, when the Fair Housing Act outlawed redlining, the city was highly segregated, and much of the region’s wealth had been pushed outside Detroit borders, according to

Thomas Sugrue,

a historian at New York University and author of “The Origins of the Urban Crisis: Race and Inequality in Postwar Detroit.”

All the while, the auto industry, hoping to expand its business and lower costs, shifted production out of Detroit. By the time

General Motors

and Chrysler filed for bankruptcy reorganization during the financial crisis, many of Detroit’s blue-collar jobs were long gone. A city population once as high as 1.8 million had fallen to around 700,000.

The housing collapse in the financial crisis hit Detroit especially hard. In the years leading up to it, lenders had made subprime loans to many Detroit residents previously shut out of the mortgage market. That briefly narrowed the homeownership gap between Black and white residents in metropolitan Detroit, before a wave of foreclosures drove down property values and tore up neighborhoods.

The Black homeownership rate across metro Detroit, including suburbs, was 31 percentage points lower than the white rate in 2007, the year before the financial crisis. By 2018 it had grown to 37 percentage points, according to data from the Urban Institute, a nonpartisan policy-research group. Detroit has the second biggest such gap after St. Louis among U.S. metro areas with at least half a million Black residents.

The subprime-lending debacle left many residents hesitant to take on debt to buy property.

Vincent Orr’s

grandmother lost her home to foreclosure in 2007, when he was a teenager. Mr. Orr, a production supervisor at

Fiat Chrysler Automobiles

NV, has bought two houses in northwest Detroit for cash at auctions run by the Detroit Land Bank Authority, a public repository of properties that are vacant or seized through tax foreclosure.

The agency has been unloading hundreds of houses a month to the highest bidder. Prices start at $1,000, but buyers must agree to fix them up.

Mr. Orr paid $2,100 in 2017 for a house for his mother. The roof was caved in, but he liked the brick work on the outside. He spent months redoing the electrical and plumbing, replacing windows and doors and putting up drywall.

Then he did it again, buying the house next door for himself last year for $1,200. He is nearly finished fixing it up, too. He has used about $100,000 of savings, plus a good bit of elbow grease, to complete the renovations.

“Cash is king because nobody can deny you,” said Mr. Orr, who is 30. “The houses that require a mortgage, a lot of people are reluctant.”

Vincent Orr at the home he bought for his mother in Detroit.

A lot of lenders are reluctant, too. Fewer than 1,700 mortgages were extended last year in the city of 670,000 people, according to a LendingPatterns.com analysis of first-lien purchase mortgages for single-family, primary residences using Home Mortgage Disclosure Act data. That is about a sixth as many as in Oklahoma City and Las Vegas, cities with smaller populations.

The low property values are the primary culprit. Lenders can earn so little profit on small mortgages—those of around $70,000 or less—that they often find it not worth the trouble to make them. Small-dollar home lending has been on the decline across the country, a shift that housing analysts say disproportionately affects people of color.

“This is a big issue of our time,” said

Alanna McCargo,

co-director of the Urban Institute’s Housing Finance Policy Center. Increasing the volume of smaller mortgages “would go a long way to reducing the racial homeownership gap,” she said.

What’s more, in neighborhoods where few mortgages exist, there is a greater risk a home won’t appraise for as much as the purchase price, which typically causes a loan application to fall through.

Low or nonexistent credit scores are another hurdle.

LaKesha Hancock,

a housing counselor and program manager at U-Snap-Bac, said many of her clients aren’t able to develop the banking relationships needed for a qualifying credit score because there are too few financial institutions in much of the city.

In Wayne County, which includes Detroit, census tracts where more than half of the people are minorities contain 26% of the county’s bank branches while housing 45% of the county population, according to the National Community Reinvestment Coalition, a nonprofit focused on community wealth-building.

Residential mortgages are scarce in much of predominantly Black Detroit.

2019 mortgage originations

Percentage of the population that identifies as Black alone or in combination with one or more other races*

This traces back to the city’s history of redlining, which singled out Black neighborhoods as being too risky for lenders.

Now the city has far more tax foreclosures each year than it has mortgage originations.

1939 grading of ‘mortgage security’ by the federal Home Owners’ Loan Corp.

Properties listed at Wayne County tax foreclosure auctions in 2019†

C: ‘Definitely declining’

2019 mortgage originations

Percentage of the population that identifies as Black alone or in combination with one or more other races*

Now the city has far more tax foreclosures each year than it has mortgage originations.

This traces back to the city’s history of redlining, which singled out Black neighborhoods as being too risky for lenders.

1939 grading of ‘mortgage security’ by the federal Home Owners’ Loan Corp.

Properties listed at Wayne County tax foreclosure auctions in 2019†

C: ‘Definitely declining’

2019 mortgage originations

Percentage of the population that identifies as Black alone or in combination with one or more other races*

This traces back to the city’s history of redlining, which singled out Black neighborhoods as being too risky for lenders.

Now the city has far more tax foreclosures each year than it has mortgage originations.

1939 grading of ‘mortgage security’ by the federal Home Owners’ Loan Corp.

Properties listed at Wayne County tax foreclosure auctions in 2019†

C: ‘Definitely declining’

2019 mortgage originations

Percentage of the population that identifies as Black alone or in combination with one or more other races*

Now the city has far more tax foreclosures each year than it has mortgage originations.

1939 grading of ‘mortgage security’ by the federal Home Owners’ Loan Corp.

C: ‘Definitely declining’

The resulting housing-market instability means there are far more tax foreclosures each year than mortgages.

Properties listed at Wayne County tax foreclosure auctions in 2019†

2019 mortgage originations

Percentage of the population that identifies as Black alone or in combination with one or more other races*

Now the city has far more tax foreclosures each year than it has mortgage originations.

1939 grading of ‘mortgage security’ by the federal Home Owners’ Loan Corp.

C: ‘Definitely declining’

The resulting housing-market instability means there are far more tax foreclosures each year than mortgages.

Properties listed at Wayne County tax foreclosure auctions in 2019†

When

Kelly Brown

bought a fixer-upper several years ago for roughly $5,000, she went to a bank where she had an account seeking a personal loan for about $15,000. The banker told her he couldn’t approve it because of her subprime credit score, Ms. Brown said. She said she thinks it was low because she didn’t have many financial accounts in her name and hadn’t attempted to build her credit.

Instead of borrowing, she used her savings to rehabilitate the house, which she bought in an annual Wayne County auction of foreclosed homes.

She went on to buy more. Though her credit score improved, she paid with cash, completing renovations as she saved, which took as long as a year. Ms. Brown, who is 36, now owns four properties, living in one and renting out three.

“I’m not looking for the system to help, because I know it’s not going to,” she said.

Residents unable to access the mortgage market miss out on federal benefits designed to spur homeownership. Through the government-sponsored mortgage entities

Fannie Mae,

Freddie Mac

and Ginnie Mae, the U.S. ensures that lenders are made whole on most mortgages, a policy that enables lenders to spread payments over 30 years at low interest rates. Mortgages also erect obstacles to quickly kicking out home purchasers who fall behind on payments.

Some groups are working to fix the issues that keep lenders from making more mortgages.

Quicken Loans founded a program with the Detroit Land Bank Authority to renovate some properties the Land Bank takes over. Quicken fronts money for repairs and then provides financing to interested buyers. Having one mortgaged property in a neighborhood will lead to more, the reasoning goes.

“If we were to just write more mortgages in Detroit, I think we would be setting people up for failure,” Quicken’s Ms. Grannemann said.

The project isn’t self-supporting. Mortgage lenders say revitalizing neighborhoods this way typically means putting more money into fixing up those first homes than they can eventually be sold for.

Vacant lots are common in Detroit just a block from the border between the city and Grosse Pointe Park.

Quicken has found that 87% of homeowners in the city who are tax-delinquent self-identify as qualifying for exemption from property taxes because their income is below a poverty threshold. It is trying to teach them how to take advantage of the exemption and avoid tax foreclosure, a common pitfall in Detroit. More than a third of city properties have gone through tax foreclosure in the past 15 years, some more than once, according to Loveland Technologies, a data firm that tracks land parcels.

United Community Housing Coalition, a nonprofit, works with the city to buy some homes headed for the foreclosure auction and sells them back to their occupants, often for the few thousand dollars or so of back taxes, payable over about a year.

Share Your Thoughts

How could Detroit residents’ access to housing credit be improved? Join the conversation below.

Real-estate investors also frequent the auction. Among them is Detroit Property Exchange, the company Ms. Lurry turned to when she was ready to buy in 2018.

It finances purchases itself, offering residents one of the less-desirable options for Detroit properties that can’t be mortgaged.

Ms. Lurry put $2,000 down on the $35,000 house and agreed to pay $700 a month for 90 months, which included 10% interest, much higher than the prevailing mortgage rate. She moved in at night, changed the locks, then shared a celebratory moment with her daughter.

She subsequently missed some payments and the company started the eviction process. Detroit Property Exchange said she was renting the house with an option to buy. Ms. Lurry thought she already owned it. “Congratulations on your recent purchase,” her paperwork from the company said. “You are now the OWNER.”

The company said in a statement provided by an attorney that Detroit Property Exchange helps customers become homeowners in a city that traditional lenders avoid.

Ms. Lurry, 52, lost her job as a pastry cook when the coronavirus shut down the casino where she worked. Her lawyer,

Steve Knox

at nonprofit Michigan Legal Services, spent months negotiating a new arrangement. She expects to enter into a new contract that will make it more difficult for the company to remove her from her home and will lower her interest rate. It will now be 8.5%, still roughly three times the rate of a standard 30-year mortgage.

Corrections & Amplifications
A previous version of this story included a video described as being a view down Alter Road, the dividing line between Detroit and Grosse Pointe Park. The video was filmed over Kercheval Avenue in Detroit. (Corrected on Oct. 29)

Write to Ben Eisen at ben.eisen@wsj.com

Copyright ©2021 Dow Jones & Company, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 87990cbe856818d5eddac44c7b1cdeb8

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To alleviate the teacher shortage, a pilot program in Tucson is offering free tuition of $ 1,000 per month https://mhwwb.org/to-alleviate-the-teacher-shortage-a-pilot-program-in-tucson-is-offering-free-tuition-of-1000-per-month/ https://mhwwb.org/to-alleviate-the-teacher-shortage-a-pilot-program-in-tucson-is-offering-free-tuition-of-1000-per-month/#respond Tue, 05 Oct 2021 06:25:52 +0000 https://mhwwb.org/to-alleviate-the-teacher-shortage-a-pilot-program-in-tucson-is-offering-free-tuition-of-1000-per-month/ TUCSON – The University of Arizona and a neighboring school district are working on a pilot program aimed at addressing a teacher shortage in order to “grow” Tucson residents into teachers by offering free classes and a monthly grant of US $ 1,000. Pay dollars. Pathways to Teaching, an educational program and support system, will […]]]>


TUCSON – The University of Arizona and a neighboring school district are working on a pilot program aimed at addressing a teacher shortage in order to “grow” Tucson residents into teachers by offering free classes and a monthly grant of US $ 1,000. Pay dollars.

Pathways to Teaching, an educational program and support system, will help 10 people get their K-8 teaching degree in 17 months – and reduce teacher counts and retention problems, proponents say. The pilot program with 10 potential teachers includes a class assistant, a member of a parent-teacher association of a school and a member of the health clinic.

Karla Amezcua, 26, works as an appointment planner at a health clinic but intends to quit her job in January to start on the Pathways program.

“When I graduated from high school and was preparing for college,” she said, “I had kind of an identity crisis. My mother had me when she went to college to be a teacher, so I wanted to be a teacher for her, but I didn’t know what I wanted for myself. “

Amezcua changed her major in social work, but switched back to training after a few credits. She eventually left college tempted by the opportunity to make money without needing a degree.

Now with a family to support, Amezcua will return to education. Her mother-in-law, who has a Masters Degree in Education, forwarded the Pathways application to her earlier this year.

Marcy Wood, the director of Pathways to Teaching and director of teaching, learning, and socioculture at the University of Arizona, said she started the program to address the problem of teacher retention in Arizona. She admits the program is small, but sees it as an example for other states and schools.

“The goal is to work on this idea of ​​people getting into the teaching profession and then leaving,” said Wood. “They go to do other things, dissatisfied with the job, go to other school districts where there may be other resources.”

Each Pathways student will receive a $ 17,000 scholarship spread over the duration of the program and $ 23,500 tuition fees – a total of $ 40,502, Wood said.

Arizona teachers often suffer Student debt they cannot repay a teacher’s salarysaid Governor Doug Ducey in his 2017 State of State Address. The Pathways program draws funding from Ducey’s Arizona Teachers Academy, established by the Governor in 2017.

“I’m looking for the best and brightest who commit to teaching in Arizona public schools,” said Ducey. “When you make that commitment, we make that commitment: your education is paid for, a job is waiting, and you are debt-free.”

Wood said funding for the Pathways students’ free classes comes from a partnership between the University of Arizona and the Arizona Teachers Academy.

Teacher churn across the country has risen sharply in the past 15 years, and a third of new teachers leave the profession within the first five years of teaching, according to nonprofit education organization Expect More Arizona.

The program, which begins in January, offers the junior and senior year equivalent of a bachelor’s degree in education. Instead of attending classes at the university, students are paired to teach in a K-8 class in the Sunnyside Unified School District. You will also take traditional classes at the district’s Los Niños Elementary School.

To be accepted, students must have earned an associate degree or equivalent in general education credits, which, according to the creators of the program, shows a student’s commitment to the teaching profession.

Upon graduation, newly certified teachers must teach in an Arizona public school for a minimum of two years. Wood hopes that the time Sunnyside learns during her apprenticeship will encourage her to stay in Tucson.

Candidates for the program will be selected from among Sunnyside employees and other Tucson residents. Of the 10 people starting in several weeks, some are teacher assistants. One person applying in 2021 is a bus driver, said Pathways to Teaching coordinator Maria Orosco.

Amezcua has worked through her identity crisis but is a little worried about how the school is going.

“I’m nervous because I haven’t been to school in five years,” said Amezcua. “I was the one who learned differently in school, I wasn’t a visual learner – and since I spoke Spanish, I didn’t always get the help I needed to understand concepts.”

Amezcua said she came back to help people like herself because her degree comes with a confirmation of English as a second language.

“I never wanted to be in the medical field,” said Amezcua. “I took this job this year because I was out of a job for a while, but this new thing is one of the greatest opportunities I’ve ever had in college.”

Since the conditions for receiving money from the Arizona Teachers Academy include teaching at an Arizona public school for two years after graduation, Amezcua hopes she can stay at the Sunnyside school she is assigned to.

Marcy Wood, teaching director at the University of Arizona College of Education, and Steve Holmes, superintendent of the Sunnyside Unified School District, are piloting a pilot project to improve teacher retention in Arizona. Photo by Mara Friedman | Cronkite news

Sunnyside School District Superintendent Steve Holmes agrees to withdraw candidates from the Tucson area.

“When I heard that Marcy was involved in this unique idea of ​​preparing teachers in-house, I was really excited about the concept,” said Holmes. “Of course, it’s no secret in Arizona that we have had a shortage of teachers staying in the field.”

Laura Garcia is a special education teacher at the district’s Santa Clara Elementary School who had to give up her dream of becoming a teacher for financial reasons.

After her mother’s death in 2017, Garcia recalled a conversation with her that inspired her to pursue her original dream of becoming a teacher.

“That was my ‘Okay, take it up and go back to school and just do it,’” she said, “because she and I talked about that all the time. So I went back to school and started improving my grades. “

After attending Grand Canyon University for nearly two years, Garcia had to drop out this year because her mother had given financial aid.

“I quit because I couldn’t financially afford my classes,” she said.

She continued to work as a special education teacher at the Santa Clara School.

“I’ve been here at Sunnyside for two years now and it really confirmed that I wanted to do that. I had a fun time there with the students and now I want my own classroom, ”she said.

Garcia said she is now waking up excited to go to work and since being a teacher is one of the more stable things in special education children, it’s an incredibly fulfilling task. She looks forward to working in a familiar environment and participating in a support program.

“I worked really hard for this,” she said.

Debra Bergman, Sunnyside’s Chief Human Resources Development Officer, worked closely with UA on the application process as Pathways students will serve as full-time tutors at the start of the program in January.

“It was great to hear their dedication to why they wanted to join this program and their love for learning and their commitment to the community because they either grew up here or started working here and built such strong relationships with the website and the people they work with, ”said Bergman, who has worked in the district for 37 years.

Holmes encouraged other universities and school districts to try the same approach to increase teacher retention, but cautioned that Pathways may not work in some districts.

“You have to see whether you have built up a sense of community in the institution. Unless you are in a district that has a strong sense of community, I am not sure you will get the results that are really meant to be part of this program, ”said Holmes.

Bergman said the months at a Sunnyside school will lead to a strong foundation “where they learned the headmaster’s expectations, worked with peers in that grade, and met the kids and parents.”

When Pathways students become full-time teachers upon graduation, they know what is expected of them and don’t have to start building that foundation the first day, she said.



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Here’s the average personal loan rate – and whether you should consider taking one https://mhwwb.org/heres-the-average-personal-loan-rate-and-whether-you-should-consider-taking-one/ https://mhwwb.org/heres-the-average-personal-loan-rate-and-whether-you-should-consider-taking-one/#respond Tue, 05 Oct 2021 06:25:52 +0000 https://mhwwb.org/heres-the-average-personal-loan-rate-and-whether-you-should-consider-taking-one/ MarketWatch highlighted these products and services because we believe readers will find them useful. We may earn a commission if you buy products through our links, but our referrals are independent of any compensation we receive. Average personal loan rates were up from a week earlier, according to the latest interest rate data from Credible, […]]]>


MarketWatch highlighted these products and services because we believe readers will find them useful. We may earn a commission if you buy products through our links, but our referrals are independent of any compensation we receive.

Average personal loan rates were up from a week earlier, according to the latest interest rate data from Credible, dated Aug. 30. In fact, the average rate on a 3-year fixed rate personal loan was 11.72%, versus 11.44%; but the average interest rate on a 5-year fixed rate personal loan was 16.51%, compared with 13.89% a week earlier. However, the interest rate that you personally get on a personal loan depends on factors such as creditworthiness, loan duration, loan size and lender. Some tariffs start at 2.49% and you can see the lowest tariffs that you qualify for here. Note that in order to get the lowest interest rates, you will typically have excellent credit ratings, use personal loans for certain things, and get shorter repayment terms. And these loans are not for everyone. Here’s what you should know before taking one out.

What is a personal loan?

Quite simply, it’s a fixed-amount loan that you get from an online lender, bank, or credit union that you typically repay every month over a period of one to seven years. The loan amounts are typically between $ 1,000 and $ 100,000.

Should You Take out a Personal Loan?

If you have excellent credit and are in need of quick cash, getting a personal loan can mean a quick approval process and lower rates than a credit card. However, if your credit is not good, personal loan interest rates can be high.

Make sure that in addition to being able to repay the loan (if it doesn’t affect your creditworthiness and ability to get future loans on good terms), you also consider fees like the commitment fee. Annie Millerbernd, personal loan expert at NerdWallet, says that based on your loan, the fee can be anywhere from 1% to 6% of the loan amount – or it can be a one-time flat rate. Learn more about personal loan origination fees here.

What should – and shouldn’t – use a personal loan for?

“If you can qualify for a lower interest rate than the alternatives, a personal loan can be an attractive way to consolidate credit debt, medical debt, finance your business, or improve your home,” said Ted Rossman, senior industry analyst at Bankrate. “Refinancing private student loans with a personal loan might make sense, but I don’t recommend them for federal student loans because they have more generous forbearance and forgiveness policies,” Rossman says.

Don’t use a personal loan for arbitrary purchases like vacation or paying for a wedding, experts say, as interest costs can easily add up. “It’s easy to end up spending too much and paying a lot of money in interest. It would be better to save if possible and pay off your savings, ”says Rossman.



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The rates on 5-year fixed rate personal loans have decreased. Is A Personal Loan Right For You? https://mhwwb.org/the-rates-on-5-year-fixed-rate-personal-loans-have-decreased-is-a-personal-loan-right-for-you/ https://mhwwb.org/the-rates-on-5-year-fixed-rate-personal-loans-have-decreased-is-a-personal-loan-right-for-you/#respond Tue, 05 Oct 2021 06:25:52 +0000 https://mhwwb.org/the-rates-on-5-year-fixed-rate-personal-loans-have-decreased-is-a-personal-loan-right-for-you/ MarketWatch highlighted these products and services because we believe readers will find them useful. We may earn a commission if you buy products through our links, but our referrals are independent of any compensation we receive. The average rate on a 5 year fixed rate personal loan fell from 16.51% in the week of August […]]]>


MarketWatch highlighted these products and services because we believe readers will find them useful. We may earn a commission if you buy products through our links, but our referrals are independent of any compensation we receive.

The average rate on a 5 year fixed rate personal loan fell from 16.51% in the week of August 30 to 15.3% in the week of September 6, according to the latest interest rate data from Credible. However, the average rate on a 3-year fixed rate personal loan rose slightly from 11.72% to 11.97%. However, the interest rate that you personally get on a personal loan depends on factors such as creditworthiness, loan duration, loan size and lender. and some rates start at 2.49%; See the lowest prizes you can qualify for here and below. Note that in order to get the lowest interest rates, you will typically have excellent credit ratings, use personal loans for certain things, and get shorter repayment terms. And these loans are not for everyone. Here’s what you should know before taking one out.

What is a personal loan?

Quite simply, it’s a fixed-amount loan that you get from an online lender, bank, or credit union that you typically repay every month over a period of one to seven years. The loan amounts are typically between $ 1,000 and $ 100,000.

Should You Take out a Personal Loan?

If you have excellent credit and are in need of quick cash, getting a personal loan can mean a quick approval process and lower rates than a credit card. However, if your credit is not good, personal loan interest rates can be high.

Make sure that in addition to being able to repay the loan (if it doesn’t affect your creditworthiness and ability to get future loans on good terms), you also consider fees like the commitment fee. Annie Millerbernd, personal loan expert at NerdWallet, says that based on your loan, the fee can be anywhere from 1% to 6% of the loan amount – or it can be a one-time flat rate. Learn more about personal loan origination fees here.

What should – and shouldn’t – use a personal loan for?

“If you can qualify for a lower interest rate than the alternatives, a personal loan can be an attractive way to consolidate credit debt, medical debt, finance your business, or improve your home,” said Ted Rossman, senior industry analyst at Bankrate. “Refinancing private student loans with a personal loan might make sense, but I don’t recommend them for federal student loans because they have more generous forbearance and forgiveness policies,” Rossman says.

Don’t use a personal loan for arbitrary purchases like vacation or paying for a wedding, experts say, as interest costs can easily add up. “It’s easy to end up spending too much and paying a lot of money in interest. It would be better to save if possible and pay off your savings, ”says Rossman.



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Average personal loan rates for 3 and 5 year fixed rate loans have fallen. Is it time to think about one? https://mhwwb.org/average-personal-loan-rates-for-3-and-5-year-fixed-rate-loans-have-fallen-is-it-time-to-think-about-one/ https://mhwwb.org/average-personal-loan-rates-for-3-and-5-year-fixed-rate-loans-have-fallen-is-it-time-to-think-about-one/#respond Tue, 05 Oct 2021 06:25:52 +0000 https://mhwwb.org/average-personal-loan-rates-for-3-and-5-year-fixed-rate-loans-have-fallen-is-it-time-to-think-about-one/ MarketWatch highlighted these products and services because we believe readers will find them useful. We may earn a commission if you buy products through our links, but our referrals are independent of any compensation we receive. Average personal loan rates have fallen, according to the latest Credible interest rate data released on Monday. In fact, […]]]>


MarketWatch highlighted these products and services because we believe readers will find them useful. We may earn a commission if you buy products through our links, but our referrals are independent of any compensation we receive.

Average personal loan rates have fallen, according to the latest Credible interest rate data released on Monday. In fact, the average rate on a 3-year fixed rate personal loan fell from 11.97% to 11.14% in the week of September 13th. And the average rate on a 5-year fixed rate personal loan fell from 15.30% to 14.88% in the same week. However, the interest rate that you personally get on a personal loan depends on factors such as creditworthiness, loan duration, loan size and lender. and some rates start at 2.49%; See the lowest prizes you can qualify for here and below. Note that in order to get the lowest interest rates, you will typically have excellent credit ratings, use personal loans for certain things, and get shorter repayment terms. And these loans are not for everyone. Here’s what you should know before taking one out.

How are these prices compared to the previous weeks?

3 year fixed loan

5 year fixed rate loan

Week of 08/02/21

11.53%

13.71%

week 08/09/21

11.31%

13.82%

week 08/16/21

11.34%

13.76%

week 08/23/21

11.44%

13.89%

week 08/30/21

11.72%

16.51%

week 06/09/21

11.97%

15.30%

week 13.09.21

11.14%

14.88%

What is a personal loan?

Quite simply, it’s a fixed-amount loan that you get from an online lender, bank, or credit union that you typically repay every month over a period of one to seven years. The loan amounts are typically between $ 1,000 and $ 100,000.

Should You Take out a Personal Loan?

If you have excellent credit and are in need of quick cash, getting a personal loan can mean a quick approval process and lower rates than a credit card. However, if your credit is not good, personal loan interest rates can be high.

Make sure that in addition to being able to repay the loan (if it doesn’t affect your creditworthiness and ability to get future loans on good terms), you also consider fees like the commitment fee. Annie Millerbernd, NerdWallet personal loan expert, says that the fee can be anywhere from 1% to 10% of the loan amount – or a one-time flat rate – based on your loan. Learn more about personal loan origination fees here.

What should – and shouldn’t – use a personal loan for?

“If you can qualify for a lower interest rate than the alternatives, a personal loan can be an attractive way to consolidate credit debt, medical debt, finance your business, or improve your home,” said Ted Rossman, senior industry analyst at Bankrate. “Refinancing private student loans with a personal loan might make sense, but I don’t recommend them for federal student loans because they have more generous forbearance and forgiveness policies,” Rossman says.

Don’t use a personal loan for arbitrary purchases like vacation or paying for a wedding, experts say, as interest costs can easily add up. “It’s easy to end up spending too much and paying a lot of money in interest. It would be better to save if possible and pay off your savings, ”says Rossman.



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Personal loan rates for 3 year fixed rate loans are dropping to their lowest point this year. Should You Consider Getting a Personal Loan? https://mhwwb.org/personal-loan-rates-for-3-year-fixed-rate-loans-are-dropping-to-their-lowest-point-this-year-should-you-consider-getting-a-personal-loan/ https://mhwwb.org/personal-loan-rates-for-3-year-fixed-rate-loans-are-dropping-to-their-lowest-point-this-year-should-you-consider-getting-a-personal-loan/#respond Tue, 05 Oct 2021 06:25:52 +0000 https://mhwwb.org/personal-loan-rates-for-3-year-fixed-rate-loans-are-dropping-to-their-lowest-point-this-year-should-you-consider-getting-a-personal-loan/ MarketWatch highlighted these products and services because we believe readers will find them useful. We may earn a commission if you buy products through our links, but our referrals are independent of any compensation we receive. The average rate on a 3 year fixed rate personal loan fell to 10.70% in the week of September […]]]>


MarketWatch highlighted these products and services because we believe readers will find them useful. We may earn a commission if you buy products through our links, but our referrals are independent of any compensation we receive.

The average rate on a 3 year fixed rate personal loan fell to 10.70% in the week of September 20, its lowest point of the year. And the average interest rate on a 5-year fixed-rate loan also fell from 14.88% to 14.35% in the same week. However, the interest rate that you personally get on a personal loan depends on factors such as creditworthiness, loan duration, loan size and lender. and some rates start at 2.49%; See the lowest prizes you can qualify for here and below. Note that in order to get the lowest interest rates, you will typically have excellent credit ratings, use personal loans for certain things, and get shorter repayment terms. And these loans are not for everyone. Here’s what you should know before taking one out.

How are these prices compared to the previous weeks?

3 year fixed loan

5 year fixed rate loan

Week of 08/02/21

11.53%

13.71%

week 08/09/21

11.31%

13.82%

week 08/16/21

11.34%

13.76%

week 08/23/21

11.44%

13.89%

week 08/30/21

11.72%

16.51%

week 06/09/21

11.97%

15.30%

week 09/20/21

10.70%

14.35%

What is a personal loan?

Quite simply, it’s a fixed-amount loan that you get from an online lender, bank, or credit union that you typically repay every month over a period of one to seven years. The loan amounts are typically between $ 1,000 and $ 100,000.

Should You Take out a Personal Loan?

If you have excellent credit and are in need of quick cash, getting a personal loan can mean a quick approval process and lower rates than a credit card. However, if your credit is not good, personal loan interest rates can be high.

Make sure that in addition to being able to repay the loan (if it doesn’t affect your creditworthiness and ability to get future loans on good terms), you also consider fees like the commitment fee. Annie Millerbernd, NerdWallet personal loan expert, says that the fee can be anywhere from 1% to 10% of the loan amount – or a one-time flat rate – based on your loan. Learn more about personal loan origination fees here.

What should – and shouldn’t – use a personal loan for?

“If you can qualify for a lower interest rate than the alternatives, a personal loan can be an attractive way to consolidate credit debt, medical debt, finance your business, or improve your home,” said Ted Rossman, senior industry analyst at Bankrate. “Refinancing private student loans with a personal loan might make sense, but I don’t recommend them for federal student loans because they have more generous forbearance and forgiveness policies,” Rossman says.

Don’t use a personal loan for arbitrary purchases like vacation or paying for a wedding, experts say, as interest costs can easily add up. “It’s easy to end up spending too much and paying a lot of money in interest. It would be better to save if possible and pay off your savings, ”says Rossman.



Source link

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8 Companies To Help You Pay Off Student Loans And Work From Home https://mhwwb.org/8-companies-to-help-you-pay-off-student-loans-and-work-from-home/ https://mhwwb.org/8-companies-to-help-you-pay-off-student-loans-and-work-from-home/#respond Tue, 05 Oct 2021 06:25:52 +0000 https://mhwwb.org/8-companies-to-help-you-pay-off-student-loans-and-work-from-home/ Half-dot images | Moment | Getty Images If you have debt on a student loan, you may be able to get repayment help through your employer – or find one to do it. More than 44 million Americans are in student debt because of it collectively $ 1.7 trillion. Now as “Big resignation“is gaining traction […]]]>


Half-dot images | Moment | Getty Images

If you have debt on a student loan, you may be able to get repayment help through your employer – or find one to do it.

More than 44 million Americans are in student debt because of it collectively $ 1.7 trillion.

Now as “Big resignation“is gaining traction and workers are looking for new jobs, employers are trying to find ways to attract and retain talent. Working remotely and offering help with these loans are some of the benefits. (See below for a list of companies with these benefits, which are now discontinuing.)

Federal student loan payments, most of which were on hold during the pandemic, are expected resume in January.

“It’s important for employers to meet employees where they are and find benefits that make sense and add value to them,” said Toni Frana, a Destin, Florida-based career coach at FlexJobs.

According to the Employee Benefit Research Institute’s Employer Financial Wellbeing Survey 2021, 17% of employers offer student loan debt assistance and another 31% plan to offer it.

About 70% of employers said employee engagement in performance has increased since 2020.

Now, many Americans want to continue working remotely instead of going back to the office. A Regulatory survey This spring, a whopping 87% have found they want the opportunity to keep going To work from home.

Here are eight companies that are reportedly helping their employees pay off student loan debt and also offer home-based jobs, according to reports FlexJobs. Average Annual Base Salary is courtesy of Payscale, unless otherwise stated in the job posting.

1. Abbott

2. American family insurance

3. CommonBond

4. Loyalty investments

5. New York life

6. NVIDIA

7. Parallon

8. Weed maps



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How Barbara Corcoran sold the Corcoran Group for $ 66 million https://mhwwb.org/how-barbara-corcoran-sold-the-corcoran-group-for-66-million/ https://mhwwb.org/how-barbara-corcoran-sold-the-corcoran-group-for-66-million/#respond Tue, 05 Oct 2021 06:25:52 +0000 https://mhwwb.org/how-barbara-corcoran-sold-the-corcoran-group-for-66-million/ Barbara Corcoran sold her real estate company The Corcoran Group in 2001 for $ 66 million. She started the company in the 1970s on a $ 1,000 loan from her ex-boyfriend and ex-business partner. The key to their success was being organized, being smart, and “spending every dollar like I was poor”. In the 1970s, […]]]>


  • Barbara Corcoran sold her real estate company The Corcoran Group in 2001 for $ 66 million.
  • She started the company in the 1970s on a $ 1,000 loan from her ex-boyfriend and ex-business partner.
  • The key to their success was being organized, being smart, and “spending every dollar like I was poor”.

In the 1970s, Barbara Corcoran took a $ 1,000 loan from her boyfriend at the time to start a real estate business with him. She never dreamed that she would sell this business for $ 66 million in 2001.

Originally the company was called Corcoran-Simone Company. (The name of her boyfriend at the time was Ramone Simone.) But when Simone announced it was him Leaving Corcoran for her secretaryCorcoran spun off part of the business into the Corcoran Group.

In an episode of the Business Insider podcast “Success! How i did itCorcoran told US Editor-in-Chief Alyson Shontell how she maxed out that $ 1,000 (which is now closer to $ 5,000, adjusted for inflation).

Corcoran didn’t come from a wealthy family – she grew up as one of 10 children in a two-bedroom, one-bathroom house. But Corcoran remembered that her mother was incredibly organized – her mother ran the family “like a boot camp” – and Corcoran channeled that energy into her career.

When she broke up with Simone, Corcoran said, she bought a three-line ad in the New York Times. She went back to her old boss at a real estate agency and asked for one of his ads to advertise; he gave her the device next to the manager’s apartment.

The apartment had an L-shaped living room and small bedroom, “like any other apartment in New York,” Corcoran recalled. She noted that most of the other New York Times ads for similar apartments were “One bedroom 320 months,” “One bedroom 330 a month,” and so on.

So she got creative. Corcoran had a wall built in the apartment and advertised it as “1 BR Plus Den: 340”.

“I probably got 80 calls the next morning,” Corcoran said. “Within the first two days, I had a check for $ 340.”

Years later, when Corcoran’s business was worth millions and its ranks had grown, she still has never given up that mindset.

Corcoran said, “Even before I sold my business when I had a thousand people salespeople, I still used the exact same methodology. I kept running against the clock and thinking, ‘Well, at least I have nine months now, I have now 10 months’ time and carefully manage my overheads and spend every dollar like I’m poor. “



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If you had invested $ 1,000 in AMD’s initial public offering, you would have that much money now https://mhwwb.org/if-you-had-invested-1000-in-amds-initial-public-offering-you-would-have-that-much-money-now/ https://mhwwb.org/if-you-had-invested-1000-in-amds-initial-public-offering-you-would-have-that-much-money-now/#respond Tue, 05 Oct 2021 06:25:52 +0000 https://mhwwb.org/if-you-had-invested-1000-in-amds-initial-public-offering-you-would-have-that-much-money-now/ modern micro devices (NASDAQ: AMD), the world’s second largest manufacturer of x86 CPUs and GPUs, was once just a shabby start-up based in the living room. It was founded in 1969, just a year after its rival Intel (NASDAQ: INTC), and the founders of the two chip manufacturers were former employees of Fairchild Semiconductor. AMD […]]]>


modern micro devices (NASDAQ: AMD), the world’s second largest manufacturer of x86 CPUs and GPUs, was once just a shabby start-up based in the living room. It was founded in 1969, just a year after its rival Intel (NASDAQ: INTC), and the founders of the two chip manufacturers were former employees of Fairchild Semiconductor.

AMD was originally a “second source” chip designer who modified chips from larger companies like Fairchild. It eventually gained more clients in several industries and went public in 1972. Let’s take a look back at AMD’s IPO to see how much a $ 1,000 investment (just over $ 6,000 in $ 2019) would be worth today.

AMD boss Lisa Su. Image source: AMD.

Do the math

AMD went public for $ 15 per share, so you could have bought 66 shares for $ 1,000. AMD stock then split six times, so you would currently own 1,782 shares, which would be worth nearly $ 70,000 today. AMD has never paid a dividend before.

AMD’s return over the same period outperformed the S&P 500’s 2,690% return. However, investors would have made significantly more money by investing in Intel’s IPO a year earlier.

Intel went public for $ 23.50 in October 1972, so you could have bought 42 shares for $ 1,000. Intel’s stock split has since been split 13 times, growing that position to 51,030 shares – which would be worth $ 2.94 million today and paying over $ 64,000 in annual dividends.

Why was AMD having trouble catching up with Intel?

Intel and AMD parted ways in the late 1970s. In 1978, Intel introduced the first x86 microprocessors, and this architecture remains the industry standard for PCs and servers to this day. At the time, AMD was producing other chips such as logic chips and RAM.

Intel signed a technology swap agreement with AMD in 1982 that allowed each company to redevelop and sell the chips developed by the other. This agreement formed the basis for AMD’s own x86 CPU business, but Intel stopped sharing its x86 designs with AMD in 1985, forcing the chipmaker to develop its own designs.

AMD continued to reconstruct Intel’s x86 CPU designs for years, but its merger with chip maker NexGen in 1996 eventually made it possible to develop original CPUs in the late 1990s. That shift allowed the company to gain market share over Intel, but a series of management changes and weaker chip designs allowed Intel to fight back.

AMD expanded into the GPU market by purchasing ATI in 2006, but this led to a war with NVIDIA (NASDAQ: NVDA). Waging wars against Intel and NVIDIA on two fronts has been exhausting and costly, and many cops have given up on the stock. A comparison of the sales of AMD and Intel shows how strongly the growth of the two chip manufacturers has diverged over the past three decades:

AMD sales (TTM) chart

AMD Revenue (TTM) Data from YCharts

But is AMD making a comeback against Intel?

AMD has struggled to keep up with Intel in the past, but investors should never judge a stock by its past performance. If they did, they’d overlook AMD’s impressive comeback over the past five years under the leadership of CEO Lisa Su.

Today, AMD’s APUs – which fuse the CPU and GPU into a single chip – power the PS4 and Xbox One. AMD’s chips will also be the upcoming PS5 and Next generation Xbox.

AMD’s new Ryzen CPUs, which are roughly the comparable CPUs from Intel at. correspond lower prices, are gaining ground again in the PC and data center market versus Intel. So is Intel’s persistent lack of chips crowded OEMs to AMD’s new chips.

On the GPU market are AMD’s newest Radeon GPUs probably appropriate NVIDIA’s offerings are blow by blow in both the low-end and high-end markets. Put simply, Lisa Sus AMD is fast becoming a major threat to Intel and NVIDIA.

Looking back is always 20/20

It’s easy to see that Intel has been a bigger investment overall than AMD over the past few decades, but in hindsight it’s always 20/20. Both chipmakers appeared to be speculative in the early 1970s, and few people likely saw the two companies having a near duopoly in CPUs by the early 21st century. AMD remains the underdog in the CPU and GPU markets, but it still has a lot of bite and could still outperform Intel or NVIDIA in the decades to come.

This article represents the opinion of the author who may disagree with the “official” referral position of a premium advisory service from the Motley Fool. We are colorful! Questioning an investment thesis – even one of our own – helps us all think critically about investing and make decisions that will help us get smarter, happier, and richer.



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