Health workers – MHWWB http://mhwwb.org/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 14:33:19 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://mhwwb.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-34-150x150.png Health workers – MHWWB http://mhwwb.org/ 32 32 FG attributes PHC failure to insufficient funding and poor distribution of health workers https://mhwwb.org/fg-attributes-phc-failure-to-insufficient-funding-and-poor-distribution-of-health-workers/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 14:33:19 +0000 https://mhwwb.org/fg-attributes-phc-failure-to-insufficient-funding-and-poor-distribution-of-health-workers/ The federal government has said limited funding for the primary health care (PHC) system stands out as a factor that has significantly limited its advancement over the years He said several other challenges that have hampered the Nigerian primary health care system are shortage and maldistribution of health care workers, dilapidated infrastructure and weak referral […]]]>

The federal government has said limited funding for the primary health care (PHC) system stands out as a factor that has significantly limited its advancement over the years

He said several other challenges that have hampered the Nigerian primary health care system are shortage and maldistribution of health care workers, dilapidated infrastructure and weak referral systems.

Minister of Health, Dr Osagie Ehanire, in his special remarks during the National Health Dialogue, pointed out that National Health Account reports published over the past decade indicate that health care expenditure have been suboptimal, with large expenditures on curative health care.

The dialogue, organized by the Center for Journalism Innovation and Development (CJID) and its sister organization Premium Times, focused on: Financing primary health care: the role of state and non-state actors

Ehanire, who was represented by the Director of Health Planning, Research and Statistics, Dr Ngozi Azodo, noted that insufficient funding for the primary health care system has had a negative impact on service delivery. such as immunization and maternal and child health services.

Ehanire said: “The Alma Ata declaration of 1978 and the recent Astana declaration of 2018 on primary health care indicate the need for a multisectoral approach to primary health care with the participation of different stakeholders, including including the community.

“Both statements call for adequate funding of primary health care systems to ensure optimal access to quality health services at the community level.

“Sound financing of primary health care in Nigeria would require collaborative efforts of state and non-state actors. While state actors within government continue to play their role in ensuring that more public resources are available for primary health care systems, a significant part of progress in financing primary health care depends on the role of non-state actors. state.

“The private sector, civil society organizations, nongovernmental organizations, the media, faith-based organizations, trade unions, professional organizations, universities, community groups and individuals can all contribute to financing primary health care in Nigeria.

Ehanire, however, said that to strengthen the primary health care system, the Federal Government of Nigeria has continued to make efforts to improve the proportion of resources allocated to the primary health care system.

According to Ehanire, the Basic Health Care Provision Fund has been a game-changer and has led to increased funding for the primary health care system through the various pathways.

“The efforts of agencies such as the National Primary Health Care Development Agency and the National Health Insurance Authority have contributed to the financing of primary health care in Nigeria.

“Guided by data from the National Health Account reports, which indicate astronomically high health expenditure, the Government of Nigeria has determined that it will provide more resources for health, hoping for a significant reduction in health expenditure and more funding for priorities such as primary health care,” he said.

Ehanire further said that the next level program of the Federal Government provides compulsory health insurance for Nigerians and guarantees a package of basic health services at no cost to citizens through the Basic Health Care Provision Fund. national health law.

“The government of Nigeria at the federal and state levels will continue to intensify their efforts to increase funding for the primary health care system.

“We hope that these modest acts will equitably and gradually increase access to health services for all Nigerians. We believe that if the federal and state governments significantly increase their budgetary allocations to the health sector, we will make rapid progress in ensuring equitable access to health care,” he said.

Similarly, the World Health Organization (WHO) country representative, Dr. Walter Kazadi Mulombo, also revealed that the National Health Account estimates that 16.6% of current health expenditure comes from the government (federal , State and LGA), 11.8% are development partners while 3.6% come from insurance.

Mulombo said that leaves the remaining 70.5% of health spending in Nigeria, including primary health care, to households paying out of pocket with catastrophic potentials.

“Furthermore, it is important to note that 61.4% of health expenditure in Nigeria is spent on communicable diseases such as Malaria (36.2%), HIV and other STDs (10.4%), Tuberculosis (5.5%) and vaccine-preventable diseases (4.7%). %),” he said.

Mulombo said, however, that given the above, the task of ensuring that all citizens have access to the quality health care they need without falling into poverty is a deliberate political decision and in a large federal nation like the Nigeria, therefore, will depend on how governments at the different levels complement but more importantly engage with non-state actors including the private sector.

“Non-state actors have therefore been full partners in ensuring that no one experiences financial hardship and is left unsatisfied.

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“Protecting people from the financial consequences of paying for health services out of their own pocket reduces the risk of people being pushed into poverty because an unexpected illness forces them to use their savings, sell assets or borrow – destroying their future and often those of their children.

“Although the COVID-19 pandemic has exposed global fractures in all systems with profound consequences, even in sectors other than health, it has nevertheless provided clear opportunities to demonstrate the importance of health not only in as a social service, but also as a key catalyst for the economic development of any nation, reaffirming that health is wealth.

“Indeed, COVID has proven that meaningful investment from non-state actors such as CACOVID in Nigeria can significantly strengthen the hand of government in achieving milestones,” he added.

In her presentation, the Director of PHC System Development of the National Primary Health Care Development Agency (NPHCDA), Dr. Ngozi Nwosu, who highlighted the federal government’s efforts to improve PHC, said that the he introduction of the NHAct 2014 aims to provide access to health services for all. Nigerians and increased investment through the BHCPF which is at least 1% CRF

“Use of innovative and results-oriented financing approaches for efficient allocation of resources
Improve health budgets by analyzing fiscal space for health to provide additional budgetary resources to the health system Expand access to a minimum package of basic services through the BHCPF,” she said declared.

She further stated that the Primary Health Care Under One Roof (PHCUOR) Scorecard Mechanism aims to improve quality through rigorous assessment of primary health care systems.

“Collaboration with the private sector through a public-private partnership (PPP) to improve access to PHC service delivery Expand service delivery to marginalized groups through the use of incentives on the side of demand such as conditional cash transfers (CCT).

“A Regulated Community Health Insurance (CBHI) model within the National Health Insurance Authority (NHIA) Increased collaboration with relevant partners to build emergency preparedness capacity as seen in cases of Ebola and COVID19 (NCDC, NAFDAC, INGOS, etc.).

“Primary Health Care Under One Roof (PHCUOR): National reform program aimed at strengthening the delivery of primary health care by centralizing its governance within the SPHCBs, reducing fragmentation and improving accountability and coordination Strengthening of decentralized management and financing systems, BHCPF),” she said among others.

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African region faces shortage of 3.5 million health workers by 2030 – WHO https://mhwwb.org/african-region-faces-shortage-of-3-5-million-health-workers-by-2030-who/ Fri, 18 Nov 2022 07:02:57 +0000 https://mhwwb.org/african-region-faces-shortage-of-3-5-million-health-workers-by-2030-who/ The African region is expected to experience a shortage of about 5.3 million health workers by 2030, the World Health Organization (WHO) has said. He said the high attrition of skilled health personnel from the region to “developed” countries in recent times threatens not only health security but also the region’s socio-economic development. Dr. Francis […]]]>

The African region is expected to experience a shortage of about 5.3 million health workers by 2030, the World Health Organization (WHO) has said.

He said the high attrition of skilled health personnel from the region to “developed” countries in recent times threatens not only health security but also the region’s socio-economic development.

Dr. Francis Kasolo, the WHO representative in the country, who made it known, challenged African governments to prioritize health in their public budgets in order to increase investments in health workers. health.

He was speaking at the opening of a three-day regional dialogue on investing in and protecting health workers in Africa yesterday in Accra.

The meeting, which brought together representatives of Member States, sub-regional bodies, investors and partners, among others, is to identify key principles for investing in the health workforce and opportunities to address the growing drain of brains.

Dr Kasolo pointed out that there is ample evidence to suggest that investing in the health workforce could accelerate universal health coverage (UHC), strengthen health security, equity and empower women and young people.

“Investing in the health workforce will protect vulnerable populations from the shocks of the current crisis and improve access to health. There is convergence in the interests and timing of key stakeholders on investments and actions in the workforce health care. The cost of inaction is unaffordable.”

A Deputy Minister of Health, Alhaji Mahama Asei Seini, admitted in a speech the brain drain in Ghana’s health sector despite the government’s efforts to employ and improve the conditions of service of workers.

It is with this in mind that the ministry, he said, has reviewed its human resources policy and strategy to improve the availability and equitable distribution of health workers across the country while ensuring their retention to achieve UHC and Sustainable Development Goal Three. goals (SDGs).