Health workers – MHWWB http://mhwwb.org/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 12:59:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://mhwwb.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-34-150x150.png Health workers – MHWWB http://mhwwb.org/ 32 32 Health workers in Zimbabwe strike after rejecting 100% pay rise https://mhwwb.org/health-workers-in-zimbabwe-strike-after-rejecting-100-pay-rise/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 12:59:00 +0000 https://mhwwb.org/health-workers-in-zimbabwe-strike-after-rejecting-100-pay-rise/ HARARE, June 20 (Reuters) – Zimbabwean health workers went on strike on Monday after rejecting an offer for a 100% pay rise last week, demanding payment in U.S. dollars as the local currency plummets. Zimbabwe’s main nurses’ union has urged the government to negotiate and warned lives will be lost if the dispute is not […]]]>

HARARE, June 20 (Reuters) – Zimbabwean health workers went on strike on Monday after rejecting an offer for a 100% pay rise last week, demanding payment in U.S. dollars as the local currency plummets.

Zimbabwe’s main nurses’ union has urged the government to negotiate and warned lives will be lost if the dispute is not resolved quickly.

The government and health workers are at an impasse after inflation jumped to 131.7% in May, a grim echo of the hyperinflation that wiped out people’s savings a decade ago.

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Government workers on Friday rejected the offer of a 100% pay rise below inflation.

At Sally Mugabe Hospital in Harare, patients seeking treatment sat in the courtyard as doctors, nurses, radiographers and pharmacists left their workplaces in protest.

“The salaries the health workers received last week were pathetic,” Enock Dongo, head of the Nurses Association of Zimbabwe, told Reuters, adding that the majority received 20,000 Zimbabwean dollars ($53) a month.

He said medical professionals across the country had decided to strike until they were paid $540 a month, the salary they received in 2018 before the local currency crashed.

A government spokesperson did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

President Emmerson Mnangagwa, who succeeded longtime leader Robert Mugabe in a 2017 coup, has struggled to end an economic crisis that began under his predecessor.

($1 = 378.0000 Zimbabwean dollars)

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Reporting by Nyasha Chingono; Editing by Anait Miridzhanian and Nick Macfie

Our standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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Health workers pull off Millennium Bridge stunt in campaign against nuclear weapons https://mhwwb.org/health-workers-pull-off-millennium-bridge-stunt-in-campaign-against-nuclear-weapons/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 15:08:55 +0000 https://mhwwb.org/health-workers-pull-off-millennium-bridge-stunt-in-campaign-against-nuclear-weapons/ Doctors and health workers in the North East took a stand against nuclear weapons during a demonstration on the Millennium Bridge. Campaign group Medact North East, made up of GPs, pharmacists, young doctors, nurses, physiotherapists and public health professionals, unveiled a banner on the bridge in support of the UN Treaty on Prohibition of Nuclear […]]]>

Doctors and health workers in the North East took a stand against nuclear weapons during a demonstration on the Millennium Bridge.

Campaign group Medact North East, made up of GPs, pharmacists, young doctors, nurses, physiotherapists and public health professionals, unveiled a banner on the bridge in support of the UN Treaty on Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons (TPNW).

The banner, which read “Healthcare workers for a ban on nuclear weapons”, was intended to draw attention to their campaign calling on the government to support the UN nuclear weapons ban treaty, which would make illegal nuclear weapons. This would give them the same status as chemical and biological weapons, cluster bombs and landmines.

READ MORE: Fuel protest to cause traffic chaos with 30mph ‘slow’ driving on the A1 in the North East

Medact says the UK government has not signed the UN nuclear ban treaty and is refusing to send an observer to the first meeting of signatories to be held in Vienna next week. The group asks the government to attend the meeting.

Protesters also sent letters to councils and MPs in the North East urging them to support the UN treaty through the ICAN Cities Appeal. Despite support from individual MPs and councillors, the group says councils across the region have yet to formally declare their support for the ban, which came into effect last year.



health workers gather to lay a banner from the Millennium Bridge between Newcastle and Gateshead in support of a ban on nuclear weapons.” content=”https://i2-prod.chroniclelive.co.uk/incoming/article24262337.ece/ALTERNATES/s615b/0_CCP_NEC_180622BANNER005JPG.jpg”/>
North East health workers gather to lay a banner from the Millennium Bridge between Newcastle and Gateshead in support of a ban on nuclear weapons.

Dr Liz Waterston, 78, is a retired GP from Heaton who has spent decades campaigning against the use of nuclear weapons. She joined Medact members on the Millennium Bridge for Saturday’s protest. Liz, a member of Medact and IPPNW, said: “Once again we are looking into the abyss of nuclear war. I have been working for the abolition of nuclear weapons since I was 15 and in 2021, finally, we got a treaty banning nuclear weapons.

“We must now ensure that the nuclear-weapon states respect the treaty and destroy their nuclear weapons.”

Medact is a national organization that brings together the health community to campaign for health justice. Medact North East was formed in the 1980s and, in addition to campaigning against nuclear weapons, it campaigned for a Green New Deal.



Dr Elizabeth Waterston, one of the North East health workers, laid down a banner from the Millennium Bridge.
Dr Elizabeth Waterston, one of the North East health workers, laid down a banner from the Millennium Bridge.

Young doctor Penny Ellis was among those protesting in Newcastle on Saturday. She said: “Nuclear weapons have been a threat for longer than I have been alive. I am deeply concerned that we now live in a world where no head of state can remember Hiroshima.

“As a health worker, I care for sick people every day, but I cannot understand the human impact of a nuclear disaster. Its scale and severity would overwhelm any health system response.”

Dr Nate Aspray, a GP, said the use of nuclear weapons would lead to a humanitarian catastrophe. “The growing risk of the use of nuclear weapons is a continuing threat to the health of our planet as a whole,” he said.

“While many countries are prepared to use nuclear weapons, their health care infrastructure is not and cannot be prepared for the humanitarian catastrophe that would result from the use of a single nuclear weapon internally of their borders; not to mention the profound implications of radiation on the health of women and children.

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Arizona officials join surgeon general in tackling health worker burnout https://mhwwb.org/arizona-officials-join-surgeon-general-in-tackling-health-worker-burnout/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 18:22:00 +0000 https://mhwwb.org/arizona-officials-join-surgeon-general-in-tackling-health-worker-burnout/ PHOENIX — Doctors, nurses and other healthcare workers across the country have reached crisis levels of burnout, prompting the US surgeon general to urge employers to review workloads and take new measures to improve well-being. Health care burnout is not a new phenomenon, but it is getting worse. The National Academy of Medicine found that […]]]>

PHOENIX — Doctors, nurses and other healthcare workers across the country have reached crisis levels of burnout, prompting the US surgeon general to urge employers to review workloads and take new measures to improve well-being.

Health care burnout is not a new phenomenon, but it is getting worse. The National Academy of Medicine found that even before the pandemic, burnout affected 35-54% of nurses and doctors, while 45-60% of medical students reported symptoms.

COVID-19 made a bad situation worse, as health workers faced long hours, a crush of critically ill patients, and added risks to their own health and that of their families. A Mental Health America survey conducted at the start of the pandemic from June to September 2020 found that 93% of healthcare workers experienced stress, 86% reported anxiety, 76% reported burnout and burnout and 41% reported loneliness.

Experiences of burnout differ from person to person, but generally consist of work-related stress, emotional and physical exhaustion, and dissociation from patients or loved ones. Anxiety, depression, or substance abuse can ensue, leading to risks to patient care or work absences.

Experts fear that the health workforce, under increasing demands with fewer resources, continues to decline faster than it can recover.

“Healthcare worker burnout is a health crisis for all of America, and that’s why we need to address it as a national priority,” said Surgeon General Vivek Murthy, who last month released a national notice drawing attention to the problem. Murthy recalled meeting a Florida nurse who said the pandemic had left him “helpless but not hopeless”.

In May, Murthy and Dr. Rachel Levine, Assistant Secretary for Health for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, hosted a panel discussion at the Phoenix Indian Medical Center to hear the experiences of local health workers and members of the Indian Health Service.

“These heroes deserve more than our gratitude; they deserve our help,” Levine said. “We are here to tell healthcare workers: we hear you, we see you and we are here to help.

Dr. Claire Nechiporenko, a pediatrician at the medical center who previously worked on the Navajo Nation, said tackling burnout was key to avoiding further downsizing, especially in underserved communities.

Research shows that more and more doctors and nurses are limiting their working hours or planning to leave their practices, and the Association of American Medical Colleges estimates a shortage of 37,800 to 124,000 doctors by 2034.

Rural areas would be among the hardest hit by a shrinking workforce, including Indigenous communities in Arizona, which already face deep health disparities and difficulty accessing health services. care.

“Even before the pandemic, we had health care shortages on reserves,” Nechiporenko said. “It’s hard to get doctors – any kind of healthcare worker – to work remotely, and most of the time it’s an environment they’ve never been to. »

During the pandemic, health workers in rural communities have been subjected to irregular and long hours, more isolation, the expectation of always being on call and lower salaries, studies show.

Beyond the differences between urban and rural health workers, gender may also play a role in burnout. The National Academy of Medicine reports that burnout may be 20 to 60 percent more likely among female physicians than among male physicians.

Vivek said it’s not just the healthcare industry‘s role to solve the problem. Government officials, community advocates, academic institutions and technology leaders must come together to help the profession thrive again.

In January, the Department of Health and Human Services announced that $103 million would go towards evidence-based training programs and practices to improve the mental health of health workers and help build resilience.

The Surgeon General’s national advisory also calls on employers to adopt paid leave, rest policies and strengthen existing policies that protect health care workers from community and workplace violence.

Additionally, he calls on medical schools to intervene to prevent student stress, introduce inclusive and community-based wellness programs, and establish schedules that reduce sleep deprivation.

In Arizona, health systems and hospitals have supported workers amid the pandemic with check-in calls and more days off. Banner Health has created “respite rooms” for workers to remove their protective gear and take time to rest and recharge in rooms filled with snacks, games, music and special lighting .

In 2020, Governor Doug Ducey announced that the state would spend $25 million to bolster hospital staff and allow facilities to reward frontline workers with bonuses for their efforts.

However, in December 2021, more than 1,000 state health professionals sent a letter to Ducey and other state officials saying the system was still in crisis and asking for help to slow down. the spread of COVID-19.

Nechiporenko, who works with several hospitals in Phoenix, said it’s important managers give workers the breaks they deserve to address lingering burnout issues.

“I really try to give everyone the time off they ask for, because it’s their time and they’ve earned it and they deserve it,” she said. “If you can be a leader…where you can give your employees…that time to get away from work and recharge to come back, I think that’s huge.”

Sticking to a solid routine and engaging in outside activities can also help health workers maintain a work-life balance and alleviate burnout, Nechiporenko said, adding that she was doing crossfit to reduce stress.

“Burnout is the same everywhere and everywhere,” she said. “It’s going to start with taking care of yourself before you can take care of others.”

For more Cronkite News stories, visit cronkitenews.azpbs.org.

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Health care workers too feel the effects of gun violence / Public News Service https://mhwwb.org/health-care-workers-too-feel-the-effects-of-gun-violence-public-news-service/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 04:02:40 +0000 https://mhwwb.org/health-care-workers-too-feel-the-effects-of-gun-violence-public-news-service/ Across the country, people continue to discuss gun violence in the wake of two major mass shootings in Texas and New York. The conversation evokes painful memories for the communities that have lived through them in the past – and a reminder that this violence hurts a wide circle of people, including medical professionals. Lynda […]]]>

Across the country, people continue to discuss gun violence in the wake of two major mass shootings in Texas and New York.

The conversation evokes painful memories for the communities that have lived through them in the past – and a reminder that this violence hurts a wide circle of people, including medical professionals.

Lynda Pond is president of the Oregon Nurses Association and was working at a Springfield hospital when a shooter killed two people and injured 25 at a nearby school in Eugene.

“You can’t just look at the immediate impact of something,” Pond said. “You have to look at the long-term impact, not just on families but on every person whose life is affected – whether it’s a doctor, whether it’s a nurse, whether it’s a social worker, whether it’s a minister , whether it’s the psychologist caring for them 20 years later as they deal with their PTSD.”

On Sunday, US senators announced they had reached bipartisan agreement on a number of gun safety laws.

Victims of the 1998 shooting at Thurston High School were brought to Pond Hospital. She spoke in Washington DC last Friday at a media event ahead of weekend March for Our Lives rallies across the country.

Pond was on duty again in 2015 when another shooter killed nine people at a community college in Roseburg. Several of the victims were transferred to his hospital.

She said she knows people who have been personally affected by gun violence, particularly during the Springfield incident, and feel the anguish whenever a shooting occurs.

“A lot of people who are victims of these traumas can’t be activists because the pain is too deep,” Pond said. “It’s all too real. So it becomes the responsibility of those of us who saw it, who weren’t immediately affected, to bring forward our experiences and experiences and share the stories.”

Pond said she hopes lawmakers can put aside their differences to ensure gun violence does not claim more victims.

“It shouldn’t be a political issue,” Pond said. “It’s a humanitarian issue.”

Disclosure: The Oregon Nurses Association (AFT Local 5905) contributes to our fund for reporting on policy and budget priorities, health issues, living wages/working families. If you would like to help support news in the public interest, click here.

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Southington School Board supports hiring mental health workers https://mhwwb.org/southington-school-board-supports-hiring-mental-health-workers/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 00:02:00 +0000 https://mhwwb.org/southington-school-board-supports-hiring-mental-health-workers/ SOUTHINGTON — School officials want to use federal pandemic funds to quickly hire eight new educators to improve student mental and behavioral health. Education leaders said it was important to start hiring early in the summer because there is a shortage of school workers. School superintendent Steven Madancy recommended hiring three social workers, a school […]]]>

SOUTHINGTON — School officials want to use federal pandemic funds to quickly hire eight new educators to improve student mental and behavioral health.

Education leaders said it was important to start hiring early in the summer because there is a shortage of school workers.

School superintendent Steven Madancy recommended hiring three social workers, a school psychologist, two board-certified behavior analysts, a special education teacher, and a program behaviorist.

Madancy suggested the district fund the positions with federal funds for the upcoming school year and possibly the following school year. After that, he hopes to use state money to support children’s mental health, a provision of the budget approved by the General Assembly last month.

The additional mental health and behavior workers will allow for greater consistency with the counselors assigned to schools and provide more support for elementary students. While some schools have full-time counselors and other helpers, others rely on part-time or contract workers.

With behavioral and mental health issues on the rise as a result of the pandemic, Madancy said consistent support is important.

“What we asked for was a range of mental health professionals who perform a multitude of functions,” he said. “We’ve had situations in the past where we’ve contacted outside agencies for set times…We can’t always predict when a student is in crisis.”

Board members said they were made aware of behavioral issues such as expulsions and suspensions.

“We all see it. We all get emails, we don’t get specifics but we see the issues,” said board member Zaya Oshana Jr.

Southington High School went into safe mode on Thursday after a student reported another student making a move with an object similar to the chamber of a bullet in a handgun. The object turned out to be a cell phone. The 17-year-old student who was observed making the request received a subpoena for breach of the peace.

Federal Pandemic Relief Funds

Madancy said mental health workers would be hired at an annual cost of $610,000. The money will come from federal pandemic relief funds — the U.S. Bailout’s Elementary and Secondary Schools Emergency Relief Fund — and leave about $600,000 in undesignated federal funds for the district.

School and city leaders disagreed on the use of relief funds for the current year’s budget. School officials wanted the money to be used for mental and behavioral health items, such as the eight approved by the board at Thursday’s meeting, while city officials reduced the requested increase by the board of education, as relief funds could be used to pay teachers’ salaries and avoid layoffs.

Earlier this year, City Council approved a budget of $104.4 million for the school district for the 2022-23 school year, an increase of 3.6%.

Board member David Derynoski said pandemic relief funds should have been used for mental health workers in the current year’s budget. He was glad the district was hiring them now.

“That’s what it was meant for,” he said. “I wish we could have done more last year. We wouldn’t have all these emails coming in, it seems almost daily, from students in crisis at the various schools.”

Hiring and ongoing funding

Madancy said if the district had to wait to hire, other districts likely would have picked up most of the available mental and behavioral health workers.

Colleen Clark, Board Chair, had questions about costs in future years. This coming year will be financed by ARP funds.

“In 2023-24, what happens? she asked.

“We’ll have to cross that bridge when we get there,” Madancy said. He expected to be able to fund the posts with ARP funding that year again.

The district’s budget for the upcoming school year did not include any new positions. Those positions that had been funded with federal funds were returned to the operating budget, Madancy said, freeing up funds for mental health positions.

jbuchanan@record-journal.com203-317-2230Twitter: @JBuchananRJ

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Health workers cited as ‘heroic agents’ of God’s healing https://mhwwb.org/health-workers-cited-as-heroic-agents-of-gods-healing/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 20:51:00 +0000 https://mhwwb.org/health-workers-cited-as-heroic-agents-of-gods-healing/ By JOHN WOODS In a post-communion reflection given during the Archdiocese’s annual Mass celebrating the dedicated work of healthcare workers and caregivers, ArchCare President and CEO Scott LaRue tenderly thanked them for the service. compassion they rendered during the throes of the Covid-19 pandemic. “You did not shy away from fulfilling your responsibilities to serve,” […]]]>

By JOHN WOODS

In a post-communion reflection given during the Archdiocese’s annual Mass celebrating the dedicated work of healthcare workers and caregivers, ArchCare President and CEO Scott LaRue tenderly thanked them for the service. compassion they rendered during the throes of the Covid-19 pandemic.

“You did not shy away from fulfilling your responsibilities to serve,” LaRue told about 400 of those workers and caregivers gathered June 2 for the annual White Mass in St. Patrick’s Cathedral. The mass is named after the traditional white costume worn by doctors and other healthcare workers.

When Covid-19 arrived in New York in March 2020, LaRue told those gathered at the morning liturgy that they “didn’t flinch and you never said no” – although they didn’t. don’t know what the coronavirus was or what it could mean.

What they did know, LaRue said, was that people served by ArchCare and other health care entities “were in pain and far too many died.”

LaRue said while he hopes Covid-19 will be “a once-in-a-lifetime experience for us”, the response from healthcare workers has been one for which “we all owe you an incredible debt of gratitude”.

He expressed his personal thanks to Cardinal Dolan for his “unwavering support” and leadership during the pandemic. “We will always be grateful for that,” LaRue said.

Due to the pandemic, it was the first time Mass had been offered since 2019. Cardinal Dolan was the main celebrant and homilist.

The opening procession featured a statue of Our Lady of Good Health commemorating the 16th century apparitions of the Blessed Mother in Vailankanni, India. Men and women holding aloft colorful umbrellas added to the pageantry.

The cardinal, in his homily, said the “brave women and men” seated before him have literally become “an answer to prayer” during the pandemic, alluded to in the responsorial psalm of the day: “Keep me safe, O God ; you are my hope.”

He returned to a time at the start of the pandemic when people came to pray in supplication, often standing on the steps outside, as the cathedral “unfortunately had to be closed due to understandable health restrictions”.

The prayers offered at Mass, he said, were in lieu of gratitude.

“God brings healing and consolation into the skilled hands of doctors, nurses, first responders, volunteers, health care personnel,” Cardinal Dolan said, citing the work of organizations such as ArchCare and the Order of Malta as well as men and women religious and chaplains.

Praising those gathered for their “hard work” delivered to many, the Cardinal went on to say, “We praise God for his healing power, and thank you all for being heroic agents of such help in these times. very difficult”.

“During the pandemic, we have seen nature at its worst, with much fear and isolation, suffering and death aplenty,” the cardinal said. “In you, beloved medical professionals, have we seen humanity at its best, as we have seen the Lord’s mercy, tenderness and healing flow from you and your skills.”

LaRue, at the end of his address, encouraged the healthcare workers and caregivers gathered to “take good care of yourselves”.

“Please don’t underestimate what you’ve been through and how long it will take you to recover,” he said, adding that they should rely on their faith, family, friends. colleagues and their courage.

“God bless you all.”

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Health workers leave in droves – FBC News https://mhwwb.org/health-workers-leave-in-droves-fbc-news/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 04:57:46 +0000 https://mhwwb.org/health-workers-leave-in-droves-fbc-news/ Large numbers of health workers are leaving Fiji for greener pastures. This has been confirmed by the Permanent Secretary for Health, Dr James Fong, who says recruitment agencies are recruiting in large numbers. Dr Fong says many health professionals in New Zealand and Australia are accepting big offers in America and that Fijian health workers […]]]>

Large numbers of health workers are leaving Fiji for greener pastures.

This has been confirmed by the Permanent Secretary for Health, Dr James Fong, who says recruitment agencies are recruiting in large numbers.

Dr Fong says many health professionals in New Zealand and Australia are accepting big offers in America and that Fijian health workers have been tapped to fill the gaps in those two countries.

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“Now a lot of our people have to go there, to New Zealand and Australia. Some of them are drawn to America. In Dubai, they usually use people trained in the Philippines. I now have information that the trained Filipinos are going straight to America and the people of Dubai are now turning to our medical professions to support themselves.

Dr Fong says a massive migration of health workers was expected and the ministry is fighting to at least control this movement.

“It’s not something you can stop. People go to greener pastures. What we can do is try to alleviate some of the issues by supporting them better in the workplace.

The Fiji Nursing Association says 80 nurses left our shores for New Zealand about two weeks ago.

FNA President Alisi Vudiniabola said he warned against this mass movement.

“That’s what the FNA is talking about; they are asking the government to take care of the nurses. If they say the grass is greener on that side, make our grass greener. Implement retention strategies so that nurses can stay behind. “

The Permanent Secretary for Health says this is a global concern.

Dr. Fong says many workers in developed countries quit their jobs after heavy coverage during the COVID-19 outbreak, so they are looking to smaller countries to provide them with human resources.

The PS claims that the training institutions are channeling a good number of health professionals, as it assures that once the economy improves further, the retention capacities will be better.

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‘We are absolutely destroyed’: Health workers face burnout even as COVID levels drop – National https://mhwwb.org/we-are-absolutely-destroyed-health-workers-face-burnout-even-as-covid-levels-drop-national/ Sun, 05 Jun 2022 11:00:46 +0000 https://mhwwb.org/we-are-absolutely-destroyed-health-workers-face-burnout-even-as-covid-levels-drop-national/ Dr. Laura Hawryluck was seized with a feeling of panic so intense that she could not concentrate, could not sleep. This time the cause was not the faces of the many patients she watched take their last labored breaths in the intensive care unit at Toronto Western Hospital, where she has spent the last two […]]]>

Dr. Laura Hawryluck was seized with a feeling of panic so intense that she could not concentrate, could not sleep.

This time the cause was not the faces of the many patients she watched take their last labored breaths in the intensive care unit at Toronto Western Hospital, where she has spent the last two and a half years treating waves of COVID -19 cases. This time it was a deadline that kept her awake.

A colleague had asked him to edit teaching materials. A routine task for her at any other time. But suddenly she began to realize the consequences of the overwhelming workload of the pandemic.

“That overwhelming feeling of anxiety about being asked to do one more thing was the almost feeling of panic that I had never felt before,” she said.

Read more:

Health workers call for radical changes in health care to treat burnout

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This episode made Hawryluck realize that she should take a step back from some of her commitments. It wasn’t an easy decision, but the exhaustion she felt was just too much.

“I had to give up some projects that I like to do,” she said. “But, you know, if I didn’t, I realized I wasn’t going to be able to get out of this.”

Life may have returned to normal for many Canadians now that COVID-19 cases are down, but the same is not true for many healthcare workers who are still struggling with outbreaks. hospitals and patients with COVID-19.

Now, after two years of extreme pandemic-related workloads, doctors and nurses say they are suffering from burnout and emotional exhaustion more than ever – and it’s causing some, like Hawryluck, to rethink their commitments. and their career options.

Dr. Darren Markland, an Edmonton doctor who also works in intensive care, recently made the difficult decision to close his kidney specialist practice after experiencing what he calls a “crisis situation.”

Dr. Darren Markland with a patient on his last day in the nephrology clinic on April 6, 2022.

Courtesy of Darren Markland

One day he posted a tweet saying he had just finished working 36 hours straight to manage a dialysis shift while covering the ICU for intensive care.

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“I was proud of that. It was just me with absolutely no insight. And when you lose your insight as a doctor, you become a dangerous doctor.

Markland says he ended up making some “deep” mistakes, which made him realize he couldn’t keep working at this pace.

Read more:

Doctor closes specialist clinic in 3rd year of pandemic to focus on intensive care: ‘I had to make a choice’

Physician burnout has never been higher in Canada, according to the Canadian Medical Association (CMA).

More than half of physicians report high levels of burnout — nearly double pre-pandemic levels and nearly half say they are likely to reduce clinical hours over the next 24 months, the president said of the CMA, Dr. Katharine Smart, to a federal committee studying the health workforce in Canada in February.

Even though the rate of the number of COVID-19 cases has started to decline in hospitals across the country, the workload and stress faced by healthcare workers has not diminished. Because even though there are fewer patients, those who need care are sicker, after two years of inability or fear of seeking treatment for non-COVID conditions.

This now adds up to another difficult reality in many hospitals, clinics and family medicine practices: many healthcare workers leave the profession altogether due to burnout and burnout, according to the CMA.

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This means there are more critically ill patients who need more care, but fewer people to care for them.


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Peterborough health officials say workplace burnout is becoming more common


Peterborough health officials say workplace burnout is becoming more common – May 12, 2022

“We are absolutely destroyed,” Markland said.

“We are literally seeing people with chronic illnesses who have not seen a primary caregiver in years and who are now showing manifestations of Third World type diabetes, high blood pressure or end-stage kidney failure. . We see young people having strokes from a combination of unmanaged stress and substance abuse.

Read more:

“A pandemic in itself”: how COVID-19 is impacting mental health

It’s a crisis that has hit the healthcare system so quickly, Markland thinks many are unprepared for it.

“You combine that with just the mental and emotional stress of being worked to the literal bone, and it generates an environment that’s tricky – I’ll say tricky because I often try not to think too much about what’s going on. go to the hospital.”

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Nurses across Canada are also suffering from burnout to such an extreme degree that they are at a “breaking point,” Canadian Nurses Association CEO Tim Guest told the same committee. federal permanent last month.

“This is an urgent national problem,” he said.

He also noted that many hospitals and primary health centers are experiencing an exodus of nurses leaving their jobs for other better paid positions in other provinces or leaving the profession entirely due to unsustainable working conditions.

A Statistics Canada report released on Friday found that one in four nurses surveyed between September and November 2021 said they intended to leave their job or change jobs in the next three years. According to the study, more than 70% of nurses considering leaving cited work stress or burnout as a major factor.

Read more:

Hospitals grapple with ‘historic’ staff absences and burnout amid 6th wave of COVID

Rachel Muir, a front-line nurse in Ottawa and bargaining unit president for the Ontario Nurses Association, says burnout ‘doesn’t even begin to describe’ what she and her colleagues feel.

“We were exhausted before it all started because we were understaffed. We were doing with it. And then the added stressors and expectations, the disrespect we were shown, all compounded.

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Muir says she overheard nurses telling her they were sitting in their car before going to work, chanting, “You can do it, it’s only 12, you only have ‘to get out of the car.’

She echoed doctors’ concerns about patients who are sicker and need more strenuous care.

“For nurses and front-line healthcare providers, the care they provide is not only more intense, more acute and more mentally challenging because these patients are more critical – there are more of these patients,” Muir said. said.


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Pandemic healthcare burnout not deterring nursing students


Pandemic healthcare burnout not deterring nursing students – May 4, 2022

Nurses who would have had to care for four to six patients two years ago are now caring for six to 10, she said.

“When someone is seriously ill, that’s a big number. And when it’s not just one of your patients who is critically ill, it’s two or three of them, and you’re expected to provide the care that you’re trained and want to provide – not only does that cause the exhaustion (of the nurses) is a moral attack for us.

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National associations that represent physicians and nurses have called on federal and provincial governments to take immediate, medium and long-term action to address critical gaps in Canada’s healthcare sector, and submitted their ideas on what which needs to be done. These include calls for more investment in recruitment and retention, training and education and for expanded support for community health care so that more Canadians have access to family doctors and doctors. other primary care providers.

Read more:

Physician burnout rate in Canada has doubled since before pandemic: survey

But levels of burnout among health care workers should also remain a top priority for governments and health agencies, says David Gratzer, an attending psychiatrist at the Center for Addiction and Mental Health in Toronto.

Many medical professionals don’t like to admit they feel overwhelmed or unable to cope because they put their patients’ needs first, said Grazter, whose patients include doctors and nurses.

David Gratzer, an attending psychiatrist at the Center for Addiction and Mental Health in Toronto.

Photo submitted.

“Over time, this could have consequences… people being less available to listen to patients; more errors were found in some studies.

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Solutions such as more flexible working hours, providing better quality work and career options, and ensuring health workers have enough vacation time are areas that should also be explored, he added.

“The most important thing for us is to remember that burnout is something that happens and we have to address it. And certainly at the hospital level, at the clinic level, putting resources into the availability of people who feel exhausted to seek care is extremely important,” Grazter said.

“We need a vibrant and healthy workforce, otherwise we will all pay the price.”

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Long Beach health workers prepared for mass shooting event but hope it never happens • Long Beach Post News https://mhwwb.org/long-beach-health-workers-prepared-for-mass-shooting-event-but-hope-it-never-happens-long-beach-post-news/ Sat, 04 Jun 2022 02:32:07 +0000 https://mhwwb.org/long-beach-health-workers-prepared-for-mass-shooting-event-but-hope-it-never-happens-long-beach-post-news/ The latest high-profile mass shooting took place Wednesday at a medical facility in Tusla, Oklahoma, in which four people were killed, including two doctors. “It hit home,” Dr. Graham Tse, Miller’s chief medical officer, told The Post on Friday. “There are always disgruntled patients and families, but I’m afraid there is one person who doesn’t […]]]>

The latest high-profile mass shooting took place Wednesday at a medical facility in Tusla, Oklahoma, in which four people were killed, including two doctors.

“It hit home,” Dr. Graham Tse, Miller’s chief medical officer, told The Post on Friday. “There are always disgruntled patients and families, but I’m afraid there is one person who doesn’t know how to express their displeasure.”

Tse said the United States is at a time when people don’t know how to express themselves in healthy ways, turning instead to violence. The Tulsa shooter had recently been treated for back pain following surgery on the Saint Francis Health System campus.

Schools have been the scene of numerous mass shootings, including a shooting last week in Uvalde, Texas that left 19 elementary school students and two teachers dead. Prior to that, a shooting occurred at a grocery store in Buffalo, New York on May 14 in which 10 people were killed.

Students from local high schools also rallied against gun violence on Friday.

Memorial and St. Mary’s have both reported an increase in the number of trauma patients with gunshot wounds. Over the past three years, Memorial has seen an increase of just over 50%, according to hospital data. St. Mary’s, meanwhile, saw a 47% jump, Gloria Carter, director of nursing at the hospital, said at the event.

“We shouldn’t have to live in fear,” Carter said of the community as a whole.

A medical professional writes on an orange medical mask during a rally against gun violence at the Long Beach Memorial on Friday, June 3, 2022. Photo by Brandon Richardson.

On the Long Beach Medical Center campus, staff are prepared for mass shootings, both internally and in the community. At least twice a year, hospital staff participate in an active-fire exercise to ensure team members are up to speed on procedures and best practices, Tse said.

The hospital also holds drills for community mass casualty events, which includes activating a command center.

Los Angeles County, and Long Beach in particular, is well prepared for such events, said Stephanie Garcia, director of trauma and acute care surgery at Memorial. Across the county, there are 15 trauma centers ready for mass shootings and other mass casualty events like earthquakes.

In Long Beach, Memorial and St. Mary’s are county-designated trauma centers. Memorial is one of seven that can accept pediatric patients, while St. Mary’s can admit adults during such events.

“We all have the ability to sustain and take the influx of patients,” Garcia said, adding that the difference between a trauma center and a standard emergency room is the ability to admit patients faster.

Each trauma center is stocked with additional supplies, including stocks of various blood types to ensure that patients do not bleed from a bullet or other injury.

Graham Tse, chief medical officer at Miller Children’s & Women’s Hospital Long Beach, greets another medical professional during a gun violence rally on campus MemorialCare Friday, June 3, 2022. Tse’s shirt reads: “protect the children, not the guns”.

Trauma centers also work with surrounding hospitals in the event of an emergency. During a mass casualty event, trauma centers may transfer less critical patients to other hospitals — in Long Beach that would be Lakewood Regional and Los Alamitos Medical Centers — to free up space and staff for new critical patients.

“We hope, however, that we never have to,” Garcia said.

After the 2012 Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting that killed 26 people, including 20 children as young as 6 or 7, Memorial and St. Mary’s partnered with local schools in a campaign called “Stop the Bleed.”

Medical professionals will visit schools to educate teachers, staff and students on how to prevent someone from bleeding, including the use of a tourniquet, Garcia said. After the Sandy Hook shooting, Garcia added, it was determined that some of the victims might have survived if civilians at the scene had known how to stop or slow the bleeding.

Garcia said she brought her young children to Friday’s event because creating a safe environment for children was important to her.

“Despite our best efforts, we’re not able to save everyone and having to watch the parents, it’s just devastating,” Garcia said. “And drop my kid off at kindergarten the next day [Uvalde], it was hard. I want to create a safe environment for them, and for all children, to grow up in.

“It’s not a political issue; it’s a public health issue,” Garcia added. “We had the ability to prevent children from dying in car accidents. We made car seat and helmet laws to protect our children. We should treat gun violence like this.

Medical professionals and first responders listen to representatives from MemorialCare and St. Mary speak at the Long Beach Memorial during a gun violence awareness rally Friday, June 3, 2022. Photo by Brandon Richardson.

A medical professional’s dog wears an anti-gun violence shirt during a rally at the Long Beach Memorial Friday, June 3, 2022. Photo by Brandon Richardson.

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Uganda: Paramedics call off strike after talks with government https://mhwwb.org/uganda-paramedics-call-off-strike-after-talks-with-government/ Fri, 03 Jun 2022 07:47:07 +0000 https://mhwwb.org/uganda-paramedics-call-off-strike-after-talks-with-government/ Additional Sourcing: Zahra Namuli ADVERTISING Allied Health Workers decided to call off their strike after successful negotiations with the government. Health workers had deposited their tools on May 16, accusing the government of not implementing the presidential directive to increase their salaries. ADVERTISING This week, the government had threatened to fire all the strikers but […]]]>

Additional Sourcing: Zahra Namuli

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Allied Health Workers decided to call off their strike after successful negotiations with the government.

Health workers had deposited their tools on May 16, accusing the government of not implementing the presidential directive to increase their salaries.

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This week, the government had threatened to fire all the strikers but they continued the strike.

However, on Wednesday officials from the Ministry of Health led by the Director General of Health Services, Dr Henry Mwebesa and the Association of Allied Health Professionals led by their President, Patrick Alibu, held a meeting during which it was agreed that all striking health workers return to work.

According to Alibu, the decision to call off the strike follows a joint position with Health Ministry officials based on agreed positions.

On the issue of pay disparities which was the main cause of the strike, Alibu noted that the government had agreed to handle the presidential directive to increase all salaries of health workers and scientists.

“And as also stipulated by the Minister of Public Service, in his letter of May 27, 2022, and we are requested to await the conclusion of the budget process and the publication of the new salary structure from the financial year 2022 /23.” Alibu said.

On the service scheme, he said the government had assured that the process would be concluded by mid-July 2022 and would encompass all service schemes including degrees.

Furthermore, it was also agreed that no one will be victimized for taking part in the industrial action.