Health professionals – MHWWB http://mhwwb.org/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 21:01:06 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://mhwwb.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-34-150x150.png Health professionals – MHWWB http://mhwwb.org/ 32 32 The Skanner News – Mother-daughter mental health professionals launch organization for black professional women https://mhwwb.org/the-skanner-news-mother-daughter-mental-health-professionals-launch-organization-for-black-professional-women/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 21:01:06 +0000 https://mhwwb.org/the-skanner-news-mother-daughter-mental-health-professionals-launch-organization-for-black-professional-women/ Darcelle Dance wants to create a strong infrastructure for black professional women in Portland. “When black women in particular move here to Portland, there’s not this infrastructure to bring them into the community here, to answer the question, ‘How do I fit in here? Where are the people?’ “The dance said The Skander. To that […]]]>

Darcelle Dance wants to create a strong infrastructure for black professional women in Portland.

“When black women in particular move here to Portland, there’s not this infrastructure to bring them into the community here, to answer the question, ‘How do I fit in here? Where are the people?’ “The dance said The Skander.

To that end, Dance, a mental health professional, teamed up with her daughter Aasha Benton, who is studying to become a social worker, to create Mo Better Wellness, Connection and Facilitation in January.

“The reason our name is so long is that we do a lot of different things,” said Dance, who currently serves as a program supervisor for the Multnomah County Early Childhood Mental Health Program. “Well-being is in the foreground, but also connection.”

In May, Dance and Benton ran a four-week pilot course to gauge interest and expand the program.

“It was all black women,” Dance said. “They loved it. It was about how jobs really weigh on you – as black women, everything weighs on you – so how do you rebuild?

“So our group’s theme was ‘Relax, Reflect, Rebuild.’ For Relax, we worked on breathing and mindfulness, encouraging participants to take inventory of how they feel. Reflecting, because this pilot group took place over several weeks, was to reflect on the week that had just ended, to ask yourself: “Did things go well and you want to move the week forward next ? and then setting goals by asking “What can I do to further integrate what went well, and how can I let go of what didn’t go well?” And for Refill, we asked: How do you refill after pouring? (The exercise) was a bit like accountability to each other.

Recruit but not retain

The group will also work to address what Dance sees – and what the data suggests – are systemic issues within workplace culture in local government and private companies.

“We’ve noticed that organizations are recruiting and hiring black women, and there’s a revolving door that tends to happen,” Dance said. “They come into these organizations and they just aren’t treated well.”

In March of last year, the City African American Network published its Black Workforce Data Reportwhich showed that the number of black employees in the city had increased from 793 in 2019 to 456 in 2021. A related survey on support for black employees showed that almost half of respondents felt “tokenized” at work, and an overwhelming majority said they did not feel supported in their workplace.

Mental health professional Darcell Dance
“Part of what we want to do is work with organizations that want to recruit and hire us, and talk to them about how you build a foundation for the women you’re trying to attract? And how do you retain them? And having real conversations with them,” Dance said. “We don’t do (diversity, equity and inclusion consulting), but we focus on equity and how you support black women.”

In Portland, one need not look far for recent, high-profile examples of black female leaders being unceremoniously fired from supervisory positions with little or no explanation: Ruby Haughton-Pitts served as Oregon AARP for two years before being fired. in January of last year; O’Nesha Cochran, former director of Portland’s first Afro-centric women’s transition house, held the position for only four months before she was abruptly fired with a vague explanation that she lacked leadership skills; Tricia Tillman was ousted as director of public health at the Multnomah County Health Department in 2017, without explanation and despite a history of glowing performance reviews.

Dance reflected on the phenomenon: “I think part of it is, are they even able to talk about what they see happening? Is it even a safe environment? There are women who occupy positions of power, and even in these positions of power, the people who work under them can have more power than them. They are not respected as the leaders they are.

Through Mo Better Wellness, Connection, and Facilitation, Dance and Benton hope to alleviate the disproportionate stress and invisible emotional labor that plagues black professional women.

“I’ve been saying this for years: I wish I could go to work every day and just do my job.

“That would be great,” Dance said. “But no, I have to deal with all the other things that go with being a black woman working in whatever environment I find myself in.

“Even the job I’m in right now, I’m in a supervisory position, and I have so many conversations with people – it’s exhausting. You can’t even have a real conversation about what’s going on. You have to play it in such a way that someone can receive it, that they can hear you. There is a lot of denial. It’s exhausting. It’s really toxic. I say it all the time, others don’t have to go through this.

“But (black women) spend a lot of unpaid time and energy doing all this work to try to make things acceptable to other people, or to have these conversations in a way that people can hear. There are a lot of workarounds – you don’t want to be too direct.

Dance and Benton hope to bring these lessons to employers looking to not only recruit but also retain a diverse workforce.

“They can do a self-assessment in their organization, we can consult with them on that and how they can make it a more inviting place for black women,” Dance said. “As part of this, we would like them to offer our services to black women as part of their package.”

Connect by retirement

Meanwhile, Dance and Benton worked with Micro Enterprise Services of Oregon (MESO) as they developed a vision for their business. A recent Vibrant Spaces grant from the City of Portland will allow them to host an in-person wellness event in September.

“We want to do retreats when it’s safe to do so,” Dance said. “Eventually we want to do this in other parts of the country or even leave the country and do these kind of wellness retreats.”

Part of the value of these sessions, Dance explained, is that attendees can feel valued and supported no matter where they are in their business development.

“Sometimes women are so new to their business that they ask, ‘Do I really have one?’ Yes, you do,” Dance said.

“It doesn’t matter if you’re still formulating it or if you’re still getting it off the ground. It’s still valid.”

After two years of battling a pandemic, Dance said, it’s helpful for women to come together and feel affirmed in their efforts.

“There are all these things that take their time – family, kids at home and trying to teach them – or they feel like their business was starting to take off but then Covid happened,” Dance said. “They maybe try to start over and then they see okay I’m on the right track and there are other women doing this too.”

For more information on Mo Better Wellness, Connection and Facilitation, email Dance and Benton at mobetter.wcf@gmail.com.

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WADA seeks to crack down on medical professionals spreading misinformation https://mhwwb.org/wada-seeks-to-crack-down-on-medical-professionals-spreading-misinformation/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 18:08:46 +0000 https://mhwwb.org/wada-seeks-to-crack-down-on-medical-professionals-spreading-misinformation/ In response to doctors and other healthcare professionals spreading misinformation and lies during the COVID-19 pandemic, the American Medical Association adopted a policy aimed at both countering misinformation while holding those responsible accountable to their professional guidance. False claims made by health professionals can be directly related to topics such as the promotion of COVID-19[feminine]treatments, […]]]>

In response to doctors and other healthcare professionals spreading misinformation and lies during the COVID-19 pandemic, the American Medical Association adopted a policy aimed at both countering misinformation while holding those responsible accountable to their professional guidance.

False claims made by health professionals can be directly related to topics such as the promotion of COVID-19[feminine]treatments, inaccurate claims of vaccine side effects and public health advice that is not based on evidence. The root of the problem is associated with a dozen individuals who represented nearly two-thirds of anti-vaccine social media posts.

Because these people can profit from misinformation, the AMA said it was necessary to address both the person’s ability to find an audience to deceive and their ability to benefit financially from that audience.

“Physicians are a trusted source of information for patients and the public, but the spread of misinformation by a few has implications for the entire profession and causes damage,” said the president of the AMA, Gerald E. Harmon, MD, in a statement. “Physicians have an ethical and professional responsibility to share truthful information, correct misleading and inaccurate information, and direct people to trusted sources of health information. WADA is committed to fighting misinformation and we need to get to the root of the problem. We must ensure that health professionals spreading misinformation cannot use large, often financially advantageous platforms to spread dangerous health claims. While we are unlikely to undo the damage caused by misinformation campaigns during the COVID-19 pandemic, we can act now to help prevent the spread of misinformation in the future.

The new policy directs WADA to work with health professional societies and other relevant organizations to implement a comprehensive strategy that includes the following priorities:

  • To maintain the AMA as a reliable source of factual information for doctors and patients,
  • Ensure that evidence-based medical and public health information is accessible by collaborating with publishers, research institutes and media organizations to develop best practices around paywalls and preprints to improve access to evidence-based information and analysis,
  • Countering misinformation spread by healthcare professionals through social media platforms and countering the monetization of the spread of misinformation on social media platforms,
  • Educate health professionals and the public to recognize misinformation and its dissemination,
  • Examine the role of health professional associations as appropriate fact-checking entities for health-related information disseminated by various media platforms,
  • Encourage ongoing training to be available for health professionals who serve as fact checkers to help prevent the spread of health-related misinformation,
  • Ensure that licensing boards have the power to take disciplinary action against healthcare professionals for spreading health-related misinformation and affirm that any speech in which a healthcare professional uses his credentials is professional conduct and may be reviewed by his licensing entity,
  • Ensure that specialist boards have the power to take action against board certification of health professionals spreading health-related misinformation, and
  • Encourage national and local medical societies to commit to dispelling misinformation in their jurisdictions.

The report notes that social media platforms have amplified the ability to spread misinformation. It concludes that the fight against misinformation disseminated by health professionals, in particular social mediawill require a three-pronged approach: prioritizing misinformation in social media algorithms, affirming and reinforcing the role of reactive fact-checking, and tackling any underlying incentive structures for professionals in the health spreading health-related misinformation.

Originally posted on our sister brand, Medical economics.

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WADA seeks to crack down on health professionals who spread false information https://mhwwb.org/wada-seeks-to-crack-down-on-health-professionals-who-spread-false-information/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 17:51:11 +0000 https://mhwwb.org/wada-seeks-to-crack-down-on-health-professionals-who-spread-false-information/ The AMA has adopted a multi-pronged strategy to try to counter the lies while requiring the responsible person to undergo professional scrutiny In response to doctors and other healthcare professionals spreading misinformation and lies during the COVID-19 pandemic, the American Medical Association adopted a policy aimed at both countering misinformation while holding those responsible accountable […]]]>

The AMA has adopted a multi-pronged strategy to try to counter the lies while requiring the responsible person to undergo professional scrutiny

In response to doctors and other healthcare professionals spreading misinformation and lies during the COVID-19 pandemic, the American Medical Association adopted a policy aimed at both countering misinformation while holding those responsible accountable to their professional guidance.

False claims made by health professionals can be directly related to topics such as the promotion of COVID-19[feminine] treatments, inaccurate claims of vaccine side effects and public health advice that is not based on evidence. The root of the problem is associated with a dozen individuals who accounted for nearly two-thirds of anti-vaccine posts on social media.

Because these people can profit from misinformation, the AMA said it was necessary to address both the person’s ability to find an audience to deceive and their ability to benefit financially from that audience.

“Physicians are a trusted source of information for patients and the public, but the spread of misinformation by a few has implications for the entire profession and causes damage,” said the president of the AMA, Gerald E. Harmon, MD, in a statement. “Physicians have an ethical and professional responsibility to share truthful information, correct misleading and inaccurate information, and direct people to trusted sources of health information. WADA is committed to fighting misinformation and we need to get to the root of the problem. We must ensure that health professionals spreading misinformation cannot use large, often financially advantageous platforms to spread dangerous health claims. While we are unlikely to undo the damage caused by misinformation campaigns during the COVID-19 pandemic, we can act now to help prevent the spread of misinformation in the future.

The new policy directs WADA to work with health professional societies and other relevant organizations to implement a comprehensive strategy that includes the following priorities:

  • To maintain the AMA as a reliable source of factual information for doctors and patients,
  • Ensure that evidence-based medical and public health information is accessible by collaborating with publishers, research institutes and media organizations to develop best practices around paywalls and preprints to improve access to evidence-based information and analysis,
  • Countering misinformation spread by healthcare professionals through social media platforms and countering the monetization of the spread of misinformation on social media platforms,
  • Educate health professionals and the public to recognize misinformation and its dissemination,
  • Examine the role of health professional associations as appropriate fact-checking entities for health-related information disseminated by various media platforms,
  • Encourage ongoing training to be available for health professionals who serve as fact checkers to help prevent the spread of health-related misinformation,
  • Ensure that licensing boards have the power to take disciplinary action against healthcare professionals for spreading health-related misinformation and affirm that any speech in which a healthcare professional uses his credentials is professional conduct and may be reviewed by his licensing entity,
  • Ensure that specialist boards have the power to take action against board certification of health professionals spreading health-related misinformation, and
  • Encourage national and local medical societies to commit to dispelling misinformation in their jurisdictions.

The report notes that social media platforms have amplified the ability to spread disinformation. It concludes that tackling misinformation spread by healthcare professionals, particularly on social media, will require a three-pronged approach: prioritizing misinformation in social media algorithms, affirming and strengthening the role of reactive fact-checking and addressing any underlying incentive structures for healthcare professionals. spread health-related misinformation.

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Acupuncture today digital number https://mhwwb.org/acupuncture-today-digital-number/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 14:21:05 +0000 https://mhwwb.org/acupuncture-today-digital-number/ × August 2016 September 2016 October 2016 November 2016 December 2016 January 2017 February 2017 March 2017 April 2017 May 2017 June 2017 July 2017 August 2017 September 2017 October 2017 November 2017 December 2017 January 2018 February 2018 March 2018 June 2018 September 2018 April 2018 July 2 May 18 2018 October 2018 November […]]]>


× August 2016 September 2016 October 2016 November 2016 December 2016 January 2017 February 2017 March 2017 April 2017 May 2017 June 2017 July 2017 August 2017 September 2017 October 2017 November 2017 December 2017 January 2018 February 2018 March 2018 June 2018 September 2018 April 2018 July 2 May 18 2018 October 2018 November 2018 December 2018 January 2019 February 2019 March 2019 April 2019 May 2019 June 2019 July 2019 August 2019 September 2019 October 2019 November 2019 December 2019 January 2020 February 2020 March 2020 April 2020 May 2020 July 20 October 20 July 20 20 October 20 July 20 2020 November 2020 December 2020 January 2021 February 2021 March 2021 April 2021 May 2021 June 2021

Acupuncture today
Back issues



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Half of local healthcare professionals report compassion fatigue as pandemic continues https://mhwwb.org/half-of-local-healthcare-professionals-report-compassion-fatigue-as-pandemic-continues/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 18:29:00 +0000 https://mhwwb.org/half-of-local-healthcare-professionals-report-compassion-fatigue-as-pandemic-continues/ More than half of local healthcare professionals and first responders have experienced compassion fatigue, according to Community Impact report published by a Sarasota-based nonprofit that helps people deal with trauma. Resilient Retreat collected the data to demonstrate the need for trauma-based services in Sarasota and Manatee counties for healthcare workers and first responders. The organization’s […]]]>

More than half of local healthcare professionals and first responders have experienced compassion fatigue, according to Community Impact report published by a Sarasota-based nonprofit that helps people deal with trauma.

Resilient Retreat collected the data to demonstrate the need for trauma-based services in Sarasota and Manatee counties for healthcare workers and first responders.

The organization’s executive director, Lisa Intagliata, says the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic has deeply affected people who help others.

“They will feel compassion fatigue because they can mirror what’s going on in the situation and what’s going on in the lives they’re saving and they often internalize that,” she said. “It’s actually a psychological phenomenon in your brain. All of us have mirror neurons and sometimes those mirror neurons, they reflect situations of stress and trauma.”

According to the survey, 52% of local healthcare professionals and first responders reported experiencing compassion fatigue, with 39% reporting moderate to severe secondary traumatic stress.

Mental health experts say compassion fatigue is often confused with burnout. But it’s more acute than just being tired. Healthcare workers and first responders are prone to mixing the stress of traumatic events they witness at work with the personal stress they experience.

Intagliata says the physical, emotional and psychological impact of helping others during the pandemic is significant.

“Seeing the patients in isolation, sometimes having to use tablets and iPhones to correspond with family members about the loved one who was hospitalized, it had a huge impact on mental health.”

The survey was produced to guide agencies on how best to help local health workers cope.

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National Certification Board for Behavioral Health Professionals to administer the National… | Nation/World https://mhwwb.org/national-certification-board-for-behavioral-health-professionals-to-administer-the-national-nation-world/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 13:03:14 +0000 https://mhwwb.org/national-certification-board-for-behavioral-health-professionals-to-administer-the-national-nation-world/ TALLAHASSEE, Fla., June 09, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Peer support is recognized as one of the most effective strategies for helping people with mental health conditions, substance use disorders, or both achieve and maintain their recovery and well-being. In support of national standards for peer services, the National Certification Board for Behavioral Health Professionals (NCBBHP) […]]]>

TALLAHASSEE, Fla., June 09, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Peer support is recognized as one of the most effective strategies for helping people with mental health conditions, substance use disorders, or both achieve and maintain their recovery and well-being. In support of national standards for peer services, the National Certification Board for Behavioral Health Professionals (NCBBHP) announced that it will consolidate and manage Mental Health America’s (MHA) National Certified Peer Specialist (NCPS). The National Certification Board for Behavioral Health Professionals is pleased to serve as a professional home for current and future Nationally Certified Specialists. The NCBBHP is a wholly owned subsidiary of the Florida Certification Board, which is the entity MHA originally contracted with to develop and administer the credential on its behalf. FCB has professionally accredited Peer Specialists since 2006, offering a tiered Peer Specialist certification portfolio that includes Provisional Certification, Full Certification and, with the acquisition of NCPS, Advanced Certification.

“It was a logical next step for the CBF to establish the National Certification Board for Behavioral Health Professionals to house the National Peer-Certified Specialist designation. Our goal is to build on the growth and success that this fantastic national title has been recognized over the past three years,” said Neal McGarry, CEO of FCB and CEO of the new NCBBHP.

In 2022, Mental Health America decided to retire from professional certification. After discussion with leaders of both organizations, the decision was made to transfer the current program to the National Council of Behavioral Health Professionals. In partnership with MHA, NCBBHP will lead this transition effort with the common goal of honoring the value and intent of the current NCPS program and providing a professional home for current and future nationally certified specialist peers. “MHA has long been committed to including lived experience and peers at all levels of mental health support – there is no change to this fundamental philosophy and commitment,” said the CEO of the MHA, Schroeder Stribling. “The MHA will continue to advocate to advance the field of peer support, including through our policy advocacy and affiliate network.”

About the National Certification Board for Behavioral Health Professionals (NCBBHP). The National Certification Board for Behavioral Health Professionals is a newly created national organization that provides professional certification opportunities to state agencies, state organizations, and other stakeholder groups to meet their needs in professional certification and regulation. The Council is a full-service third-party national accrediting body, offering behavioralhealthprofessional.com high quality, psychometrically sound and legally defensible professional accreditation services, including role delineation studies; examination plans; Item banks; examination instruments; standard setting; processing of applications; administration of examinations; Continuing education; Ethics and Discipline; and related credential maintenance services. We currently provide service in Florida, Oregon, Vermont, Michigan and Illinois. SNPC is a national program that currently supports over 275 certified peers nationwide and is available to any eligible applicant across the country. Our goal is to promote national standards and reciprocity for credentialed professionals who provide behavioral health services to those seeking and maintaining recovery from mental health and substance use disorders.

About NCPS certification. The national title of Certified Peer Specialist is awarded to those who have demonstrated advanced skills in mental health and peer-to-peer services. The credential was designed in 2015 by national peer leaders, developed by nationally recognized peer subject matter experts, and validated by workforce peers. It is designed to build on existing state-level Peer Specialist credentials and award advanced skills recognition to those with at least three (3) years of current full-time Peer Specialist experience. , training, and knowledge base to pass a 125 multiple-peer specialist advanced proficiency choice exam.

Effective date. Current Certified Professionals and candidates will be contacted individually with information about transitioning to national board in early June 2022. We have over 35 years of experience developing and managing certification programs and are currently managing certification projects in six (6) states and Canada, working with over 35,000 certified individuals. We are confident that our experience will translate into a smooth transition to the new operation.

Call to action. We seek advice and guidance from as many peer-focused organizations as possible, with the goal of inclusiveness. Anyone interested in serving on the National Behavioral Health Professional Certification Advisory Board to promote, support and guide our national accreditation efforts is encouraged to contact Amy Farrington, Director of Certification, at afarrington@flcertificationboard.org for an application. .

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National Certification Board for Behavioral Health Professionals to administer the National Certified Peer-Certified Specialists (NCPS) Professional Certification Program https://mhwwb.org/national-certification-board-for-behavioral-health-professionals-to-administer-the-national-certified-peer-certified-specialists-ncps-professional-certification-program/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 13:00:00 +0000 https://mhwwb.org/national-certification-board-for-behavioral-health-professionals-to-administer-the-national-certified-peer-certified-specialists-ncps-professional-certification-program/ The National Certification Board for Behavioral Health Professionals (NCBBHP) announced that going forward, Mental Health America’s (MHA) National Certified Peer Specialist (NCPS) program will be consolidated and managed by the NCBBHP. National Certification Board for Behavioral Health Professionals National Certification Board for Behavioral Health Professionals TALLAHASSEE, Fla., June 09, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Peer support […]]]>

The National Certification Board for Behavioral Health Professionals (NCBBHP) announced that going forward, Mental Health America’s (MHA) National Certified Peer Specialist (NCPS) program will be consolidated and managed by the NCBBHP.

National Certification Board for Behavioral Health Professionals

National Certification Board for Behavioral Health Professionals

TALLAHASSEE, Fla., June 09, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Peer support is recognized as one of the most effective strategies for helping people with mental health conditions, substance use disorders, or both achieve and maintain their recovery and well-being. In support of national standards for peer services, the National Certification Board for Behavioral Health Professionals (NCBBHP) announced that it will consolidate and manage Mental Health America’s (MHA) National Certified Peer Specialist (NCPS). The National Certification Board for Behavioral Health Professionals is pleased to serve as a professional home for current and future Nationally Certified Specialists. The NCBBHP is a wholly owned subsidiary of the Florida Certification Board, which is the entity MHA originally contracted with to develop and administer the credential on its behalf. FCB has professionally accredited Peer Specialists since 2006, offering a tiered Peer Specialist certification portfolio that includes Provisional Certification, Full Certification and, with the acquisition of NCPS, Advanced Certification.

“It was a logical next step for the CBF to establish the National Certification Board for Behavioral Health Professionals to house the National Peer-Certified Specialist designation. Our goal is to build on the growth and success that this fantastic national title has been recognized over the past three years,” said Neal McGarry, CEO of FCB and CEO of the new NCBBHP.

In 2022, Mental Health America decided to retire from professional certification. After discussion with leaders of both organizations, the decision was made to transfer the current program to the National Council of Behavioral Health Professionals. In partnership with MHA, NCBBHP will lead this transition effort with the common goal of honoring the value and intent of the current NCPS program and providing a professional home for current and future nationally certified specialist peers. “MHA has long been committed to including lived experience and peers at all levels of mental health support – there is no change to this fundamental philosophy and commitment,” said the CEO of the MHA, Schroeder Stribling. “The MHA will continue to advocate to advance the field of peer support, including through our policy advocacy and affiliate network.”

About the National Certification Board for Behavioral Health Professionals (NCBBHP). The National Certification Board for Behavioral Health Professionals is a newly created national organization that provides professional certification opportunities to state agencies, state organizations, and other stakeholder groups to meet their needs in professional certification and regulation. The Council is a full-service, third-party national credentialing organization, providing high quality, psychometrically sound and legally defensible professional credentialing services, including role delineation studies; examination plans; Item banks; examination instruments; standard setting; processing of applications; administration of examinations; Continuing education; Ethics and Discipline; and related credential maintenance services. We currently provide service in Florida, Oregon, Vermont, Michigan and Illinois. The SNPC is a national program that currently supports over 275 certified peers nationwide and is available to any eligible applicant across the country. Our goal is to promote national standards and reciprocity for credentialed professionals who provide behavioral health services to those seeking and maintaining recovery from mental health and substance use disorders.

About NCPS certification. The national title of Certified Peer Specialist is awarded to those who have demonstrated advanced skills in mental health and peer-to-peer services. The credential was designed in 2015 by national peer leaders, developed by nationally recognized peer subject matter experts, and validated by workforce peers. It is designed to build on existing state-level Peer Specialist credentials and award advanced skills recognition to those with at least three (3) years of current full-time Peer Specialist experience. , training, and knowledge base to pass a 125 multiple-peer specialist advanced proficiency choice exam.

Effective date. Current certified professionals and candidates will be contacted individually with information about transitioning to national board in early June 2022. We have over 35 years of experience developing and managing certification programs and are currently managing projects certification in six (6) states and Canada, working with over 35,000 certified individuals. We are confident that our experience will translate into a smooth transition to the new operation.

Call to action. We seek advice and guidance from as many peer-focused organizations as possible, with the goal of inclusiveness. Anyone interested in serving on the National Behavioral Health Professional Certification Advisory Board to promote, support and guide our national accreditation efforts is encouraged to contact Amy Farrington, Director of Certification, at afarrington@flcertificationboard.org for an application. .

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Image 1: National Certification Board for Behavioral Health Professionals

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This content was published via the newswire.com press release distribution service.

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Health professionals call for a ban on fossil fuel advertising (poll) https://mhwwb.org/health-professionals-call-for-a-ban-on-fossil-fuel-advertising-poll/ Wed, 08 Jun 2022 14:32:00 +0000 https://mhwwb.org/health-professionals-call-for-a-ban-on-fossil-fuel-advertising-poll/ By Adele Loiselle June 8, 2022 10:32 a.m. Is it time to treat fossil fuel advertising the same as tobacco advertising? A group of more than 30 health organizations across the country, representing 700,000 health professionals, think so. The Canadian Association of Physicians for the Environment has released an open letter calling on the federal […]]]>


Is it time to treat fossil fuel advertising the same as tobacco advertising?

A group of more than 30 health organizations across the country, representing 700,000 health professionals, think so.

The Canadian Association of Physicians for the Environment has released an open letter calling on the federal government to ban advertising promoting fossil fuels.

The ban would include ads for gasoline, fossil fuel utilities and even gas-powered vehicles. The association also wants federal authorities to crack down on misleading environmental claims and full public disclosure of health risks.

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“The greenwashing of fossil fuels is a huge issue that is confusing Canadians and hindering climate action,” said CAPE President-Elect Dr. Melissa Lem. “In British Columbia, where nearly 600 people died in the heated dome last year, the gas industry dangles the promise of ‘renewable natural gas’ in ads to convince homeowners to install gas in their house. However, less than one percent of the fuel mix is ​​renewable. The rest is fractured gas, which is accelerating the climate crisis and harming the health of the local communities where it is extracted.

If successful, it would be the first ban in the world.

Canada banned tobacco advertising in 1988 because of the health risks presented by smoking. CAPE argues that fossil fuels are just as harmful.

A Health Canada report said air pollution from fossil fuels is responsible for 15,000 to 34,000 deaths in Canada a year, and children who live in homes with gas stoves are at increased risk. asthma from 24 to 42%.

“Canadians with asthma are disproportionately affected by poor air quality, but all Canadians deserve to breathe clean air,” said Asthma Canada President and CEO Vanessa Foran. “We owe it to the next generation to act on this evidence.”

The letter launches a new campaign called “Fossil Fuel Ads Are Making Us Sick.”

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Government of Canada helps match international health professionals with jobs in their field https://mhwwb.org/government-of-canada-helps-match-international-health-professionals-with-jobs-in-their-field/ Mon, 06 Jun 2022 17:12:20 +0000 https://mhwwb.org/government-of-canada-helps-match-international-health-professionals-with-jobs-in-their-field/ OTTAWA, June 6, 2022 – With additional federal support for the National Navigation Network for Newcomers (N4). An announcement at CHEO today confirmed additional funding of $1.5 million from Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) and highlighted that newcomers are vital to Canada’s workforce. Many are highly skilled and educated in healthcare, but face barriers […]]]>

OTTAWA, June 6, 2022 – With additional federal support for the National Navigation Network for Newcomers (N4).

An announcement at CHEO today confirmed additional funding of $1.5 million from Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) and highlighted that newcomers are vital to Canada’s workforce. Many are highly skilled and educated in healthcare, but face barriers to contributing fully to Canada’s healthcare systems. At the same time, existing labor shortages in the health sector have worsened during the COVID-19 pandemic.

“Newcomers are an integral part of our communities. Their full inclusion in our healthcare workforce will help us address staffing shortages, while incorporating rich and diverse voices of lived experience and better supporting other newcomers,” said Alex Munter, President and CEO of CHEO, where N4 is housed and was created.

“CHEO welcomes N4’s new initiative to integrate trained healthcare professionals into the Canadian workforce more quickly. We thank the Government of Canada for supporting this effort. This is an important step towards greater health equity,” added Munter.

With new funding from IRCC, N4 can help qualified IEHPs achieve full employment in the Canadian healthcare sector by addressing the many barriers they face.

“Canada is an international leader in settlement and integration. We know it’s not enough just to bring people here, but we also need to make sure they’re ready to succeed when they get there,” said the Honorable Sean Fraser, Minister of Immigration, Refugees and of Citizenship. “When newcomers succeed, our community succeeds. Newcomers working in our hospitals, long-term care homes and other health facilities are actively contributing to our recovery from COVID-19. »

The PSFE program builds on the initial investment from IRCC that enabled the development of N4.

Why N4 was created

The National Navigation Network for Newcomers brings together professionals and organizations that work with and serve newcomers, with the goal of helping them navigate Canada’s health and social care systems. N4 was created to create opportunities for newcomer services professionals from all sectors of health care and social services to collaborate, so that they can be fully equipped to support newcomer patients and clients.

The PSFE program extends the original N4 mandate of improving access to services to the goal of access to gainful employment for newcomer health professionals – something that recognizes the wealth of education and experience that can enrich our ability to provide culturally safe health care in this country. N4 brings together diverse stakeholders to build a mutual understanding of the experiences of IEHPs and the work done to date, and offer concrete solutions to the barriers to employment that too many people face.

“I am extremely proud of the cross-industry connections, learnings and collaborations our network has built since 2019, and how our online platform has evolved to meet the needs of its members,” said Christine Kouri, Manager of the equity and diversity at CHEO. “We look forward to working with current and new members of our network to continue to support health and social service professionals as they respond to the ever-changing challenges of newcomers to Canada.

Highlights

  • In 2022, the CMA, CNA, and the College of Family Physicians of Canada collectively told Parliament that hiring PSWs was one of the six pillars needed to overcome health care workforce shortages in the country. .

  • At the end of 2019, more than 40,000 jobs in the health sector were unfilled. The pandemic has made the situation worse.

  • In 2022, 66% of IEHPs seeking medical residency have not found a partner, compared to 4% of Canadian-educated medical graduates.

Media contact

About the National Newcomer Navigation Network (N4)

Funded by IRCC and housed at CHEO, N4 was created in 2019 through an IRCC Service Delivery Improvement (SDI) grant to remove barriers for newcomers to access and experience in health care and social services. N4’s pan-Canadian cross-sector network brings together professionals from the health sector, social services sector, settlement sector, academia and other sectors to connect, learn and collaborate. N4 provides opportunities for professional development, continuing education, networking, and sharing of data and resources, with the goal of promoting best practices in the field of newcomer navigation.

To date, N4 celebrates:

  • Engagement with 214 organizations and 726 professionals from the health, settlement, social service and academic sectors across Canada to ensure that N4 programming meets the needs of professionals serving newcomers

  • Over 940 L4 members, including underemployed IEHPs who work in the settlement sector in various roles

  • 40 webinars attended by over 2,400 N4 members and non-members

  • Over 1,200 registered for the inaugural N4 conference, which included 75 cross-industry speakers, networking sessions and a focus on the voice of lived experience

  • More than 1,550 professional development resources and online training in both official languages

  • Over 75 professionals have successfully completed the N4-Saint Paul University online program

  • 123 subject matter experts from health, settlement, social services, academic and other sectors across Canada

About CHEO

Dedicated to the best life for every child and adolescent, CHEO is a world leader in pediatric health care and research. Based in Ottawa, CHEO includes a hospital, children’s treatment centre, school and research institute, with satellite services located throughout Eastern Ontario. CHEO provides excellence in complex pediatric care, research and education. We are committed to working in partnership with families and the community to provide exceptional care – where, when and how it is needed. CHEO is a founding member of the Kids Health Alliance, a network of partners working to create a high quality, standardized and coordinated approach to pediatric care centered on children, youth and their families. Each year, CHEO helps more than 500,000 children and youth in Eastern Ontario, Western Quebec, Nunavut and Northern Ontario.

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How healthcare professionals can navigate a digital world we don’t yet fully understand https://mhwwb.org/how-healthcare-professionals-can-navigate-a-digital-world-we-dont-yet-fully-understand/ Fri, 03 Jun 2022 16:00:37 +0000 https://mhwwb.org/how-healthcare-professionals-can-navigate-a-digital-world-we-dont-yet-fully-understand/ Every October, I receive dozens of messages commemorating the victims of the Tree of Life Massacre in Pittsburgh, where 11 of my neighbors were murdered while worshiping at the synagogue across the street from my home. It is the synagogue where my children went to Hebrew school, and where my wife and I were married, […]]]>

Every October, I receive dozens of messages commemorating the victims of the Tree of Life Massacre in Pittsburgh, where 11 of my neighbors were murdered while worshiping at the synagogue across the street from my home.

It is the synagogue where my children went to Hebrew school, and where my wife and I were married, the spiritual thread running through the Jewish community of Pittsburgh.

I am part of this community. I’m also the former president of Allegheny General Hospital, where the killer was treated after his arrest.

That’s why I get the grades every year. Messages of resilience and empathy – of all colors and creeds – demonstrate the endurance of the human spirit.

That these memories are delivered via the miracle of digital communication is an irony that does not escape me. By all accounts, the anger that drove Robert Bowers to kill these worshipers in 2018 was fueled by this same online infrastructure, born in the belly of social media platforms where vitriol is rewarded via algorithms and violent fantasies are broadcast around the world.

Unfortunately, we are once again faced with this same type of heartbreaking violence. The details are different – black Americans in Buffalo, New York, and school children in Uvalde, Texas – but the effect is similar: a community has been assaulted by a disgruntled young man whose sense of reality has been twisted and whose online fingerprints foreshadowed the murders.

Increasingly, real-world social voids are being filled with digital connectivity. For many, that means more time in Zoom meetings. But for some, isolation has meant finding common cause in the dark corners of the internet. Buffalo supremacist radicalized online; the Texas gunman announced his plans ahead of time in direct messages online and posted disturbing photos of the guns on Instagram.

With so many of these murders, the common denominator is often mental illness exacerbated by irrational grievances and fear of “the other”. These symptoms have always existed, cultivated by our darker national impulses, but they are metastasizing much faster in the digital age.

These crimes are a manifestation of hate, mental illness and access to firearms. But they are also, in my opinion, the worst possible symptom of our increasingly digital lives.

We are seeing these symptoms earlier and earlier. Last fall, the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and two other organizations issued an emergency statement: Emergency visits due to behavioral health crises in children increased between 2019 and 2020, in all age groups.

It’s an alarming trend, partly attributable to the way our children are consuming social media.

As for adults, it’s been clear for over a decade that social media and internet addiction can harm our physical and mental health. Beyond the internet’s direct impact on behavioral health, digital forums have undermined the health profession itself. Misinformation, conspiracy theorists and charlatans with the online public have all colluded to erode the collective trust that is the foundation of our healthcare system.

What seems to be holding up, at least for now, is the cornerstone of our profession, the sacred trust between patient and clinician. But these days, even that trust is being tested. Patients search online for cures that match their political ideology, not their symptoms. For the past two-plus years, every emergency department in America has seen patients who deny the existence or seriousness of the very thing that put them in the hospital, COVID-19.

Obviously, all is not black. The digital revolution has brought about significant innovations for our industry – telehealth and video visits have literally saved lives during the pandemic, for example. Yet these tragedies remind us of how much we still have to learn about these powerful mediums and the challenges they pose to medical professionals and those in our care.

So what should we do about it? In our role as healthcare providers, the best thing we can do is stick to the scientific process, accept uncomfortable answers, and be honest with ourselves, our colleagues, and our patients. When we admit what we don’t know and dive into research, we maintain our independence and credibility.

That’s the long game. In our personal lives, however, we can act more immediately: Be kind to one another. Lead your organizations with empathy. As Fred Rogers, one of Pittsburgh’s most famous sons (and a pioneer in child behavioral health) might have suggested, be a good neighbor.

In working to rebuild the Tree of Life as a center for dialogue, our multiethnic, interfaith coalition of Pittsburgh neighbors has often revisited the words of Genesis 1:1: “God said, ‘Let there be light; And there was light. God saw that the light was good, and God separated the light from the darkness.’ ”

When it comes to digital communications, we may not be able to completely separate light and dark. But we must recognize that both exist and seek to better understand their impact on our health, because our patients, our profession and our society trust us to do so.

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