Health professionals – MHWWB http://mhwwb.org/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 20:03:45 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://mhwwb.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-34-150x150.png Health professionals – MHWWB http://mhwwb.org/ 32 32 BVI attracts healthcare professionals from Cuba, the Philippines and Ghana https://mhwwb.org/bvi-attracts-healthcare-professionals-from-cuba-the-philippines-and-ghana/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 20:03:45 +0000 https://mhwwb.org/bvi-attracts-healthcare-professionals-from-cuba-the-philippines-and-ghana/ in All news / By: BVI News Nov 16, 2022 7:49 AM / As the BVI continues to struggle with a shortage of healthcare professionals to provide vital services locally, Health Minister Marlon Penn has announced steps are being taken to hire and retain staff to serve the community. Minister Penn said the BVI Health […]]]>

As the BVI continues to struggle with a shortage of healthcare professionals to provide vital services locally, Health Minister Marlon Penn has announced steps are being taken to hire and retain staff to serve the community.

Minister Penn said the BVI Health Services Authority (BVIHSA) has reached an agreement with Cuba that will result in the deployment of a limited number of health professionals to the BVI over the next year.

Minister Penn did not specify the number of Cuban health care providers who will be deployed.

He added that nurses are among the most needed healthcare professionals in BVIs, so the territory is looking to Asia and Africa to help fill the void.

“New markets for recruiting nurses are being actively explored, especially in Ghana and the Philippines, as nursing shortages are the most pressing concern at the moment. Retention initiatives are being reviewed by the BVIHSA Board of Directors for all clinical and paramedical staff to ensure trained staff can be retained while working within budgetary limitations,” Penn told the House of Assembly on November 15.

In a bid to attract more healthcare professionals, the government has also partnered with H Lavity Stoutt Community College, which will provide continuing professional development opportunities to improve the skills of allied health professionals and other technical staff. who are already working in the health sector.

Minister Penn said the shortage of healthcare professionals is not unique to BVI and is faced by many countries around the world.

He also said the problem had been compounded by the global COVID-19 pandemic and had led some countries to offer more attractive packages, including increased compensation packages and immigration incentives to attract medical professionals. to their jurisdictions.

Copyright 2022 BVI News, Media Expressions Limited. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or distributed.

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Life and Death – Need for More Black and Brown Health Professionals https://mhwwb.org/life-and-death-need-for-more-black-and-brown-health-professionals/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 13:00:01 +0000 https://mhwwb.org/life-and-death-need-for-more-black-and-brown-health-professionals/ Across the country, the number of stories in the evening news about gun violence in black and Latino communities might lead many to believe that the leading cause of death for black people in cities like Chicago is Gun violence. But it’s wrong. The leading cause of death among blacks is due to chronic diseases […]]]>

Across the country, the number of stories in the evening news about gun violence in black and Latino communities might lead many to believe that the leading cause of death for black people in cities like Chicago is Gun violence. But it’s wrong. The leading cause of death among blacks is due to chronic diseases such as cancer, heart disease and diabetes.

With lack of resources, access to quality health care, medical providers and a long history of legitimate mistrust from the medical community combined with systemic racism all adds up to poor health outcomes and premature death for black people. The White House recently released initiatives to improve opportunities for Black Americans, including efforts to reduce health care costs and improve health care outcomes, but more needs to be done.

One way to combat this crisis is to diversify the medical workforce by putting more blacks and Latinos on the path to medicine and STEM professions. While blacks and Latinos make up nearly 31% of the U.S. population, they make up less than 12% of physicians.

Today a white Chicagoan lives 8.8 years longer average than a black or Hispanic Chicagoan. When comparing certain neighborhoods, the gap widens at 17 years. Persistent racial prejudices, stereotypes and false beliefs about biological differences between blacks and whites have done harm, less precise treatment and less access to specialist care when needed for black people.

To fill this gap, the path to medicine and STEM must start early with an intentional focus on cultivating professional identity, workforce development, and training for healthcare. Over the past 10 years, I have seen the power in providing STEM career exploration, mentoring, and work placements to high school and college students.

As Executive Director of STEM with Chicago Public Schools and now the Rush Education and Career Hub, I have seen young black and Latino people jumpstart their careers early earning industry degrees in computer science, phlebotomy and electronic medical records. These degrees have allowed them to explore the work environment, strengthen their sense of self-efficacy and set them on the path to greater economic mobility.

These same racial biases and false beliefs manifest themselves in both primary and secondary education and in higher education, causing harm to so many young people. This evil worsens and results in inadequate training and limited access to networks and share capital.

Close up of doctor’s stethoscope.
Smith/Gado/Getty Images Collection

In Chicago, where a medical district, a tech hub, and five universities and community colleges are within five miles of these black and Latino communities, it’s unfathomable and outrageous. It is a failure of politics and imagination that more black and Latino community residents are unable to access mid- and high-skill jobs in health care and STEM – close jobs with wages sufficient to meet the family’s needs.

Certainly, these medium and high-skilled jobs like respiratory therapist and cardiologist usually require four-year and graduate degrees. Most residents of surrounding Black and Latino communities only have a high school diploma.

However, there are several healthcare jobs that only require a high school diploma and certification, such as an emergency medical technician or a phlebotomist. These roles can be a gateway or entry-level job to bring more people down the medical path. Putting young people on the path to these skilled trades and these professional paths requires technical training and an understanding of the skills and aptitudes required for the field. This means providing an early start in primary school to nurture curiosity and begin to build stamina for STEM learning.

This means a three-pronged approach to providing quality teachers, stronger math foundations, and problem-based learning. This means offering paid internships for apprenticeship or hands-on “on the job” learning. This means providing opportunities to engage and learn from professionals and close peers who are “like them” or who have walked the path; strengthen the feeling of personal effectiveness and professional identity. It means finding a way to make medical school more affordable and accessible to people, regardless of their socioeconomic status. Today, medical school costs between $200,000 and $350,000, making it out of reach for many. As of 2022, black and Latino students represented 14% of US medical school graduates.

For black people to live longer and have a better quality of life, there is an urgent need to address some of the social determinants of health through the prevention of chronic diseases, the promotion of healthy lifestyles, the prevention of violence, improving the general health of mother, child and family and improving employment status. To research shows that to get these healthier outcomes, you need to have more black doctors.

Although the task is daunting, there are organizations such as American Medical Association, faculties of medicine and health care systems that have recognized the need to do more to diversify the medical workforce. Pipeline programs and workforce initiatives play a critical role in guiding Blacks, Latinos, and other underrepresented groups into health care careers. As the country grapples with the current shortage of health workersemployers, educators, policy makers, funders and advocates must do everything possible to develop the next generation of black and Latino healthcare professionals.

Its a question of life or death.

Rukiya Curvey Johnson is Vice President of Community Health Equity & Engagement and Executive Director of the Rush Education and Career Hub (REACH) for The Rush System for Health and a Public Voices Fellow through The OpEd Project.

The opinions expressed in this article are those of the author.

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Police departments call on mental health professionals to help respond to crisis calls – 95.5 WSB https://mhwwb.org/police-departments-call-on-mental-health-professionals-to-help-respond-to-crisis-calls-95-5-wsb/ Sun, 13 Nov 2022 20:28:36 +0000 https://mhwwb.org/police-departments-call-on-mental-health-professionals-to-help-respond-to-crisis-calls-95-5-wsb/ ALEXANDRIA, Va. — In some local police departments, they’re trying something new. Mental health professionals are now accompanying officers to deal with the rise in mental health cases they are seeing, but some critics question how safe it is. Channel 2’s Blair Miller went along, to see what kind of impact they have. It’s the […]]]>

ALEXANDRIA, Va. — In some local police departments, they’re trying something new.

Mental health professionals are now accompanying officers to deal with the rise in mental health cases they are seeing, but some critics question how safe it is.

Channel 2’s Blair Miller went along, to see what kind of impact they have.

It’s the middle of the week one afternoon in Alexandria, Virginia. The police unit is not looking for criminals.

“It’s unbelievable the number of mental health related calls that are coming in,” said Constable Tommy Evans.

“It’s only getting worse,” said psychologist Dr. Megan Hencinski.

For two days, Miller rode with the special team that pairs Evans with Hencinski.

She’s not an officer, but rides with Evans every day, and they’re focused on responding to sanity calls.

They responded to numerous calls, including one involving a 7-year-old child who was violently struggling with his mother in a doctor’s office.

Because these two have worked with this family before, they called the mother along the way.

Once they arrived, they met inside the doctor’s office and within minutes Evans and Hencinski were able to help pull the child out and bring the situation under control.

“We unfortunately have to call quite regularly, and that has saved us from a lot of very difficult situations. If we didn’t have those resources, frankly, I think we would have a lot more hospitalizations. A lot more potentially, especially interventions later in life, like in the justice system,” the mom said.

The police program started in October 2021.

Police say that of the calls that could have resulted in an arrest, 71% were resolved without anyone going to jail.

“I would say there’s been almost an explosion of interest in other models of responding to people in behavioral health crisis,” said Megan Quattlebaum, of the Council of State Governments Justice Center in New York.

They surveyed 70 police departments across the country and found that 76% of them use a program similar to the one we saw in Virginia.

“A lot of law enforcement organizations say, ‘We want a different way of responding to someone who is presenting a crisis, more than posing a risk to public safety,'” Quattlebaum said.

There are also critics like Dr. Alex Del Carmen, who trained thousands of officials at the FBI Training Academy.

He wonders how safe it is to have a psychologist in the car who is not an officer with formal police training.

His concern is “whether or not you are really exposing another person to a very dangerous situation that they may not be ready for, and therefore the officer is going to have to worry not only about their life, but also of that person’s life.”

Police said that was also something they were thinking about.

They said if there was a security risk, only an officer would deal with the situation, while the psychologist is told to stay back or even stay in the car.

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U.Va. Health professionals warn of possible ‘twindemia’ – Le Cavalier Quotidien https://mhwwb.org/u-va-health-professionals-warn-of-possible-twindemia-le-cavalier-quotidien/ Thu, 10 Nov 2022 19:03:19 +0000 https://mhwwb.org/u-va-health-professionals-warn-of-possible-twindemia-le-cavalier-quotidien/ With the winter season fast approaching, the risk of COVID-19 outbreaks has increased and flu rates are high, especially in the densely populated communities of the University. Health officials warn of the strong possibility of a simultaneous spike in flu and COVID-19 cases causing a rare phenomenon – a twindemic. Although COVID-19 cases in Charlottesville […]]]>

With the winter season fast approaching, the risk of COVID-19 outbreaks has increased and flu rates are high, especially in the densely populated communities of the University. Health officials warn of the strong possibility of a simultaneous spike in flu and COVID-19 cases causing a rare phenomenon – a twindemic.

Although COVID-19 cases in Charlottesville are downthey are expected to increase as winter sets in. more than 400 dead involving COVID-19 are happening every day in the United States. This number is expected to increase, possibly over 1,000 daily deaths by March if current booster vaccination rates persist, per year. updated analysis from the Commonwealth Fund and the Yale School of Public Health.

The rise of new variants, increased indoor interaction compared to the past two years, and decreasing levels of community immunity lead to increased risk of COVID-19. Combined with high flu rates, the United States faces a viable risk of twindemic this winter, according to Dr. Costi Sifri, director of hospital epidemiology at U.Va. Health, detailed to a U.Va. Health press briefing.

“We could [and] should anticipate a flu season this year,” Sifri said. “We’ve seen a pretty robust flu season in the southern hemisphere this summer, their winter in Australia, for example. We should expect to see that now.

Australia is currently coming to the end of its worst flu season in five years. Flu season started earlier and hit children the hardest. In particular, it is Australia first severe flu season since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic.

“People are back together, [so] there is a much higher chance of the flu spreading,” Sifri said. “There is much less immunity to flu since people haven’t had the flu for a few years. At the same time, there are possibilities for transmission of COVID-19 over the next couple of months.”

The CDC reports that the 2020-21 season has seen the lowest influenza activity on record, which increases the risk of infection, especially among the most vulnerable.

The increase in flu rates can also be attributed to the reduction in community prevention methods. Use of face mask, physical distancing and reduced travel helped avoid a twindemic last year. Now, almost half of Americans rarely or never wear face masks indoors, despite CDC recommendations. The University’s mask mandate has been liftedalthough students are still encouraged to wear masks in public, particularly when feeling unwell.

The experts agreed that a lack of mask use and non-adherence to vaccine recommendations are the main factors behind the high risk of twinemia this winter. If the twin is achieved, hospitalization rates will risestraining an already overburdened and understaffed health system.

Housing and Residence Life no longer has isolation housing available for all students who contract COVID-19, so students should take their own precautions if they become infected. Yashasvisai Veeramasu, a first-year engineering student, is one of many students who have planned to self-isolate.

“My roommate [and I] are actually not far [away]so we have the option to go home if we end up catching something,” Veeramasu said.

Members of the Charlottesville community and university students can still take several precautionary measures in order to stay protected against COVID-19 and the flu. Most importantly, doctors recommend getting COVID-19 boosters and flu shots.

“The best thing we can do to protect ourselves is to make sure we’re up to date with our COVID-19 and flu shots,” Sifri said.

At the press conference, Dr. Max Luna, associate professor of cardiovascular medicine, urged university students to take appropriate precautions.

“Vaccination remains extremely effective in preventing hospitalization and death from COVID-19,” Luna said.

The current COVID-19 booster is bivalent, targeting two variants of Omicron – BA. 4 and BA. 5. The CDC recommends that people five years of age or older receive the bivalent booster if it has been at least two months since their last dose of the COVID-19 vaccine. For people five years of age or older who have recently tested positive for COVID-19, the recommendations allow for the next dose of vaccine to be received once three months have passed since testing positive.

There are many options for getting your flu shot and COVID-19 boosters in Charlottesville. The Blue Ridge Health District offers vaccines in local health services, a mobile health unit, community events and local pharmacies. Independent pharmacies such as SVC also provide these shots.

Boosters and flu shots are also available through organizations on the ground, such as Madison House. Students may make such appointments at any time by registering with the Student Health and Welfare Service.

Most students and staff are fully vaccinated with the first two doses of the COVID-19 vaccine, but they are strongly encouraged by U.Va. Health officials to get their boosters updated.

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Official IT partners with mental health professionals, La… https://mhwwb.org/official-it-partners-with-mental-health-professionals-la/ Sat, 05 Nov 2022 15:45:54 +0000 https://mhwwb.org/official-it-partners-with-mental-health-professionals-la/ (MENAFN– EIN Presswire) IT manager, mental health advocate, hip-hop artist, songwriter By Fran Briggs Metrics and level of engagement were most important. His message about survival has reached over 10 million people and generated over a million comments. – Fran Briggs, Publicist at IT OfficialLOS ANGELES, CA, USA, November 5, 2022 / / – Mental […]]]>
(MENAFN– EIN Presswire)

IT manager, mental health advocate, hip-hop artist, songwriter

By Fran Briggs

Metrics and level of engagement were most important. His message about survival has reached over 10 million people and generated over a million comments. – Fran Briggs, Publicist at IT OfficialLOS ANGELES, CA, USA, November 5, 2022 / / – Mental health advocate, hip-hop artist, songwriter, Los Angeles community activist and graduate of Rutgers University—Newark, , is teaming up with America’s mental health professionals, its publicist announced today. Her goal is to leverage her (to reach those struggling with depression and suicidal thoughts and give everyone a free survival kit.

After IT quoted one of his survival poems on social media, it went viral and immediately began changing lives. Metrics and level of engagement were most important. His post about survival has reached over 10 million people and generated over a million comments.

In true rhythm and poetry fashion, IT delivered inspirational words to live by for their online audience.

Fueled by a passion to encourage, enlighten and empower others, IT created and began distributing what he calls a survival kit. It includes her exclusive music, jewelry, merchandise, games, prizes and more. The purpose of the artist is to encourage fulfillment and purpose.

The survival kit also includes free mental health resources, a mental health checklist with crisis contacts, and a floating keychain with an inspirational quote.

“I am delighted to collaborate with mental health organizations and mental health professionals. They provide the tools and resources to clinically support this demographic,” said a charismatic IT manager. “Generous donations to this campaign will not only help fund my tour, but leave my audience with something useful, tangible and memorable.”

GoFundMe Page IT and Logistics Official Tour

The official ➣IT tour starts in November 2022 and ends in March 2023
➣Donors around the world can participate and are encouraged to donate $20.00 to $2,000
➣ Contributors will be featured on company websites, social media pages, and in newspaper and TV press releases
➣ A GoFundMe page has been created to fund his tour. To contribute visit
➣ GoFundMe campaign contributors will be featured on IT websites, social media pages, and in newspaper and TV press releases
➣ Mental health professionals represent several sectors including psychiatry, psychology and others

“As IT Official continues to grow, so does the need for an infrastructure capable of supporting its efforts,” said Publicist to IT Official. “The GoFundMe campaign will help ensure that participants have access to specialists in the mental health and behavioral science industries, and receive survival kits at no cost.”

ABOUT Official

IT Official (aka Infinite T) was born in Staten Island, NY to biracial parents in 1991. His name was Travis Meade. Her mother is from Barbados and her father is Italian and Irish. The artist has been writing poetry and rap lyrics since the age of 10. He grew up and spent most of his life in New Jersey before moving to Los Angeles, California. In college, he recorded his own remixes of his favorite songs and then sold them out of his school locker. He received a bachelor’s degree from Rutgers University, Newark. It has been featured on soundtracks such as EA Sports’ NBA2K21 video game and public health messages. The artist enjoys writing love songs, deeply thoughtful poetry, and aggressive, positive raps. He yearns to be more like Jesus and less like himself. His influences are Eminem, Fabolous, Lauryn Hill, Lil Wayne and J Cole. IT The welcomes those interested in becoming promotional partners. For more information, including how to book an IT manager, call (862) 800-7910 or visit For sponsorship opportunities, please contact Fran Briggs at 928-275-1342 or email

Francois Briggs
eMedia campaigns!
+1 928-275-1342

Visit us on social media:

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how healthcare professionals can help – Croakey Health Media https://mhwwb.org/how-healthcare-professionals-can-help-croakey-health-media/ Fri, 04 Nov 2022 06:05:17 +0000 https://mhwwb.org/how-healthcare-professionals-can-help-croakey-health-media/ Introduction by Croakey: The past two years have seen a decline in global routine immunization rates, particularly for human papillomavirus (HPV) and diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis (DTP3) vaccines. In July, the World Health Organization reported that “the number of completely unvaccinated children has increased by five million since 2019”. According to Assistant Professor Michael Moore […]]]>

Introduction by Croakey: The past two years have seen a decline in global routine immunization rates, particularly for human papillomavirus (HPV) and diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis (DTP3) vaccines.

In July, the World Health Organization reported that “the number of completely unvaccinated children has increased by five million since 2019”.

According to Assistant Professor Michael Moore AM, keeping up to date with vaccinations is a way to reduce morbidity and mortality and help minimize the burden on overburdened hospital systems.

It is also important to better understand the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the uptake of vaccination and the role of health professionals in vaccination.

Chair of the Global Immunization Policy Task Force for the World Federation of Public Health Associations and a member of the All Ages Immunization Committee, Moore encourages healthcare professionals to Complete a survey investigate their views on vaccination.


Michael Moore writes:

The Immunization for All Ages initiative brings together a diverse group of organizations from around the world, working to address inequities and improve access to immunization to help promote lifelong health, preserve function and to help prevent death and disability.

To achieve this, the IFAA calls to action through a manifesto in support of a life-course approach to immunization to be strengthened through strategic alignment with international health agendas.

Through the Global Immunization Policy Task Force, the World Federation of Public Health Associations is also trying to better understand the changing role of health professionals in immunization.

A survey conducted by the WFPHA tries to understand the impact of COVID-19. All healthcare professionals, from those on the front lines to civil servants who write policy and everyone in between, are encouraged to participate in the investigation.

The survey covers the entire life course and includes the vaccination coverage of children.

The declining commitment of parents to regularly vaccinating their children and the reduction in coverage in some countries are of particular concern.

The WFPHA tries to understand, among other things, the influence of health professionals on vaccination rates. As the WFPHA is in official relations with the World Health Organization (WHO), this information will be made available to WHO (with analysis) as soon as possible.

The World Health Summit

The World Health Summit in Berlin this year provided an excellent opportunity to address the issue of vaccination throughout life. Childhood vaccination is well understood in Australia and uptake has been among the highest internationally.

However, with the backlash to the controls put in place to combat COVID-19 and the potential for anti-vaxxers to get disproportionate media attention, the challenges are mounting in many countries.

With the onset of winter in Europe and the withdrawal of almost all control measures, vaccination against COVID-19 has become even more important. As we have learned in the southern hemisphere, vaccination against respiratory ailments has become more important than ever.

Reducing the incidence of influenza, pneumococcus, COVID-19 and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) through well-targeted vaccination programs will help reduce morbidity and mortality and will also help prevent overloading of systems hospitable.

Of particular significance are the ramp-up of ambulances, pressure on emergency departments in hospitals, and the postponement or cancellation of elective surgeries.

Vaccination targets

Presenting members of the IFAA group at a side event at the World Health Summit provided an opportunity to reach out to national governments, NGOs and other influencers to encourage vaccination at all ages.

To do this, IFAA advocacy approaches are rooted in a manifest which is based on three fundamentals:

  • Prioritize lifelong immunization as an essential pillar of expanded prevention strategies and a central element of universal health coverage.
  • Remove barriers to access to appropriate vaccination across the lifespan to ensure that all people are protected and no one is left behind.
  • Reduce inequities in timely, appropriate, and affordable access to immunization across the lifespan.

Despite the WHO Immunization program 2030 targets, millions of adults are not immunized with one or more of the vaccines recommended for their age group and status, putting them and others at risk of certain infectious diseases.

Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, countries have explored different ways to administer vaccination. This has highlighted the need to modify the delivery infrastructure, particularly to support immunization of the elderly.

In a nutshell, widespread vaccination will protect the individual, support health and social protection systems and families.

At the World Health Summit, I argued that it is in the context of strained health systems that the need to build appropriate confidence in the safety, efficacy and quality of government-approved vaccines regulations should be considered a priority for governments.

Across Australia, there has been immense confidence in the COVID-19 vaccination as such high proportions of people have come forward to receive their first shots. This should be seen as an opportunity to build confidence in lifelong vaccination.

The role played by health professionals as a trusted source of information is a key element in building community confidence in vaccines.

The notion of vaccine fatigue was examined emphasizing the importance of effective communication about vaccines and building trust to counter this sentiment. The need for appropriate campaigns and to reaffirm the effectiveness of vaccination at the individual and population level is essential.

This is one of the reasons why the WFPHA Global Immunization Policy Task Force is continuing the survey attached to this article and why Croakey readers are encouraged to share and participate.

The objective is to help the WFPHA to continue its advocacy work at the national and international level to protect the health of populations.

Take the survey

Participation is easy and accessible via this link or by using this QR code.

About the Author

Adjunct Professor Michael Moore AM PhD is the current Chair of the Global Immunization Policy Task Force for the World Federation of Public Health Associations and is a former president of the WFPHA. He recently attended the World Health Summit in Berlin to present at a side event on the issue of improving immunization beyond pediatric immunization.

Moore is a member of the Committee on Immunization for All Ages (IFAA) and his participation in the World Health Summit was supported through this committee by Pfizer.


See Croakey’s article archive at children’s health.

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How Flagstaff Mental Health Professionals Work in Their Difficult Work https://mhwwb.org/how-flagstaff-mental-health-professionals-work-in-their-difficult-work/ Sun, 23 Oct 2022 13:15:00 +0000 https://mhwwb.org/how-flagstaff-mental-health-professionals-work-in-their-difficult-work/ SIERRA FERGUSON Sun Staff Reporter On the wall of Rainbow’s End in downtown Flagstaff, above a row of felt hats and between sets of sweaters, are 13 diverse works of art. At first glance, they might not seem connected. A black cat is photographed on a bright red field. Above the walk-in closet is a […]]]>

SIERRA FERGUSON Sun Staff Reporter

On the wall of Rainbow’s End in downtown Flagstaff, above a row of felt hats and between sets of sweaters, are 13 diverse works of art. At first glance, they might not seem connected.

A black cat is photographed on a bright red field. Above the walk-in closet is a pastel painting of a barn quilt block, interrupted by the silhouette of a crow on a square canvas. Rays of light shoot out from behind a mountain peak in a pencil drawing – rendered as a graphic by a black pointer on a white background. Behind a stack of sweaters is a piece of pottery, and above the register sits an orange person with a mushroom hat head surrounded by tiny white flowers.

What binds the pieces together is their purpose – not for the viewers, but for the performers.

Rainbow’s End features work created by mental health professionals in Flagstaff. Counselors and social service providers, who care for the mental and emotional needs of others, need ways to deal with the pressure themselves.

People also read…

The show is the “brainchild” of Sirene-Rose Lipschutz, clinical crisis manager at Terros Health.

She has two children, is currently studying for her doctorate, and is responsible for two crisis response centers in Flagstaff.

“I couldn’t do it without going home at night and painting or sculpting,” Lipschutz said. “For me personally, I do a lot of art, all the time to feel better. I get involved in all kinds of things and get into this stuff that really makes me feel good. Ninety-nine percent of what I do is not related to sanity or anything specific. I paint flowers and make little mythical creatures out of clay. Fun and light things. I use a lot of colors.

The art exhibit celebrates the coping strategies of people who often work behind closed doors or in the background of a world made more severe and challenging by COVID-19.






Kersti Taha and Siréne-Rose Lipschutz of Terros Health stand under artwork on display Thursday morning inside Rainbow’s End. Terros is currently hosting an art exhibit at the local clothing store to show how art can be used to help manage and prevent burnout in high-stress jobs.


Rachel Gibbons, Arizona Daily Sun


“In COVID, you are in a state of persistent flux. A state of not knowing. It’s not sustainable for the human brain,” she explained. “We had to continue in this state. Some people have the tools they need and the coping skills to pull through, but even some of the most resilient and courageous people have crumbled, at least sometimes. We’ve all hit rock bottom at least temporarily during COVID. So much research has come out of the pandemic on burnout.

Lipschutz began noticing that Terros was increasingly being asked to provide support to mental health professionals during the pandemic – tackling burnout.

“Suddenly I’m in a session with my own therapist and I felt the need to ask her how she was doing. It’s not very common to be able to ask your therapist that and have her say, ‘I’m struggling. she said. She also explained that the authenticity needed for a counselor or therapist to talk about their own struggles is vital.

Personal care and artistic practices are essential to maintaining some of this authenticity.

“If I want to show myself, I have to take care of myself. I believe mental health work needs authenticity and the people doing the work need to be themselves,” said Deidre Hayes, licensed professional counselor at Flagstaff Counseling Center. “If I don’t have my balance, I’m going to collapse. Self-care is essential.

Hayes always turned to jobs where she could help others, from career work at the guidance center and child and family support services, to previous work as a child care worker. disabled. In these roles, Hayes faced trauma and had to deal with listening to and supporting people during their darkest hours – day to day.

“I had a depression at one point because I didn’t take care of myself. I collapsed on the floor and thought, ‘Nothing is working!’ said Hayes. “It’s an everyday thing to say, ‘What am I doing today that’s going to feed my soul, release the tension in my body, give my brain a rest?'”

Now she paints. She sculpts. Most often, Hayes writes poetry. Regardless of the medium, she says art has become a way for her to add variety and relaxation to her life.

“For me with COVID, sometimes it was just the lack of novelty, for at least two years of our lives. It wasn’t that my client’s business was too big for me, or that my business was too big for me, it was just that I heard it eight hours a day, and then I felt it 24 hours a day,” Hayes said. “Sometimes when we’re in burnout it’s because we’re going through something similar and it’s just too overwhelming and we don’t have anything different to turn to. Art can be that thing. Another kind of meditation, another kind of exercise. All new to the brain. I think art is one of the easiest ways to do that, because there are so many mediums.

Hayes found that the art offered enough benefits in her personal life that she introduced it into her professional practice.

“I have tattoo pens, so when people are a little on edge [in a counseling session] I’m like, ‘Hey, do you want to write about yourself and we can do therapy like that, or do you want to color?’ I use it in my practice. I use it in my personal life, and it’s a way out of that redundancy,” Hayes said.

Despite the role of art in her life, Hayes never considered herself an artist. So far.







Terros Art Show at Rainbow's End

Artwork is displayed alongside clothing Thursday afternoon at Rainbow’s End in downtown Flagstaff. The pieces are part of a show organized by Terros Health to show how art can be used to prevent and treat burnout associated with high-stress jobs.


Rachel Gibbons, Arizona Daily Sun


“Now, technically, I’ve shown my art,” she said. “I don’t think I ever called myself an artist, but I feel like I can now! Maybe it’s like a new piece of my identity.

For Lipschutz, celebrating mental health workers as artists and creators was one of the key points of the show.

“A lot of the focus is on our client, and it should be,” said Lipschutz, who also explained that art often ends up in the “security plans” Terros develops with its clients. to help them get through a crisis. “We need to focus on our customers, but the way to do that is to take care of ourselves. That’s the goal here, to honor our caregivers, to honor the people who are trying to hold us back, while having to stand up.

As she put pieces together, she reached out to her network and distributed flyers to colleagues at several organizations and facilities.

She was surprised to discover how many people, like her and Hayes, have used creativity to cope with and heal from vicarious trauma.

“We have juvenile detention reps, and I’ve worked with her before and she’s an amazing performer. She has a piece of pottery. I’ve found that people I’ve worked with for years or see and meet are using art,” Lipschutz said.

Even one of Terros’ interns from Northern Arizona University’s Master of Social Work program turned out to be an artist. Kersti Taha responded to calls with the CARE unit and the Terros Mobile Response Team. Sometimes she rides a bike or goes for a hike to decompress after helping a client through a crisis. Other times, she puts on headphones and grabs a pencil.

“Something about it is so soothing to me and soothing. Seriously, when I put on my headphones and draw, I don’t think of anything. I don’t think about the calls I received, or at school, or anything in my life. I just create and it’s a very therapeutic experience for me,” Taha said.

During the artistic walk on the first Friday of October, at the opening of the fair, a passer-by asked if Taha’s drawing was for sale. His piece, the one with the mountain crowned by beaming light in pencil and felt-tip pen, also became a point of pride.

“I just think it’s really cool. One of the most fun things about First Friday was getting text messages from people whose art is up asking, “What time is First Friday?”. Just knowing that they are proud that their parts are here; wanting to come and bring their friends,” Lipschutz said. “I just want it to be visible. Much of what we do happens behind closed doors and the focus is not as much on caregivers. I just wanted to bring visibility to community members who really support the community – through this little glimpse into their minds and their world.”

Another element of this visibility is awareness.

Hayes said: “I think it’s just a really ingenious way to advocate for mental health. Because people think of therapy or mental health as, “That’s how I feel,” right? Being able to advocate for sanity in a way that feels like, “Yeah, I painted tonight.” It’s really relevant.

The Mental Health Caregiver Art Exhibit organized by Terros and Rainbow’s End will be in place for the remainder of October.







Terros Art Show at Rainbow's End

Artwork is displayed alongside clothing Thursday afternoon at Rainbow’s End in downtown Flagstaff. The pieces are part of a show organized by Terros Health to show how art can be used to prevent and treat burnout associated with high-stress jobs.


Rachel Gibbons, Arizona Daily Sun


Sierra Ferguson can be reached at sierra.ferguson@lee.net.

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BC cities ask mental health professionals to join police in mental health appeals https://mhwwb.org/bc-cities-ask-mental-health-professionals-to-join-police-in-mental-health-appeals/ Fri, 21 Oct 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://mhwwb.org/bc-cities-ask-mental-health-professionals-to-join-police-in-mental-health-appeals/ Cities in British Columbia’s Lower Mainland are asking their local health authority and the province to support police officers who respond to dozens of mental health calls every day. The mayors of Burnaby and Coquitlam have both asked Fraser Health to provide mental health professionals to accompany police on mental health calls, similar to programs […]]]>

Cities in British Columbia’s Lower Mainland are asking their local health authority and the province to support police officers who respond to dozens of mental health calls every day.

The mayors of Burnaby and Coquitlam have both asked Fraser Health to provide mental health professionals to accompany police on mental health calls, similar to programs established in other cities in British Columbia.

On October 18, Const. Shaelyn Yang, who also went by her first name, Tzu-Hsin, was stabbed to death while responding to a call about a tent at a local park. According to the Integrated Homicide Investigation Team, she had gone with a city employee to inform the man inside that he would not be allowed to continue living there.

Jongwon Ham, 37, has since been charged with first degree murder. Ham was wanted on a previous assault charge at the time of his arrest.

Yang worked with the Burnaby RCMP’s Mental Health and Outreach Team (PMHOT), which is made up of three officers who work with community agencies on mental health and homelessness issues.

WATCH | BC RCMP Chief Superintendent remembers officer killed in the line of duty

Burnaby RCMP Chief Superintendent remembers officer killed in the line of duty

Supt. Graham De La Gorgendiere paid a moving tribute to Const. Shaelyn Yang, who died Tuesday morning after being stabbed during an altercation in Burnaby, British Columbia

“De facto social workers”

In an interview with The Canadian Press, Sgt. Steve Addison of the Vancouver Police Department said the police have become de facto social workers for people who lack support services while battling homelessness, mental illness and addiction, which could put them in potentially dangerous situations.

Addison said “police by default” is increasingly the reality for people who have no place to live or the help they need for mental health issues that keep them in encampments that have tend to be moved from place to place.

“We see people living with this constellation of very complex social issues that not only make them dangerous, but make other people dangerous,” he said.

A cop with a jacket that reads on it
Cities like Burnaby and Coquitlam say they would like to see their officers partner with mental health professionals, like the Car 87 program in Vancouver. (Gian-Paolo Mendoza/CBC)

As part of a mental health outreach program known as Car 87, the Vancouver Police Department pairs an undercover officer with a registered nurse or registered psychiatric nurse who assesses or provides community referrals for people living with mental illness. The program began in 1978.

Police are also partnering with an outreach team from Vancouver Coastal Health to deal with people with more complex mental health needs where a history of violence may be involved, Addison said.

According to the British Columbia RCMP, mental health-related calls increased by 9% in British Columbia from 2018 to 2020. Over the same period, mental health-related apprehensions increased by approximately 18 %.

Requests refused

The City of Burnaby says it first approached Fraser Health about a similar Car 87 partnership in late 2019.

Their request was denied.

But earlier this year, the city and the RCMP renewed the request, and the city says those conversations are ongoing.

“It’s something we have to get,” Mayor Mike Hurley said. “I’m past being nice to it. We’re struggling. This situation just keeps getting worse.”

The nearby city of Coquitlam asked for similar support, but was told Fraser Health was unable to help.

“The back seat of a police cruiser is for suspects, not patients,” Mayor Richard Stewart said, noting the city needs more support for mental health calls so people don’t get confused. not found in police cars.

sergeant. Chris Manseau of the BC RCMP says the RCMP is “very supportive” of a collaborative approach to mental health appeals.

Advocates have long called for mental health professionals, including social workers and nurses, to be involved in mental health-related calls to the police.

“At some point we’re going to see another tragedy directly attributable to this kind of process happening,” Stewart said.

const. Shaelyn Yang, 31, worked with the Burnaby RCMP Mental Health and Homelessness Outreach Team. She was killed in the line of duty on October 18, 2022. (Provided by the RCMP)

A Fraser Health spokesperson said the health authority is working with law enforcement in several communities on different types of initiatives, including case management, treatment and homelessness response teams. shelter.

“We are committed to continuing to work closely with local law enforcement to reduce the risk of harm for people who have mental health and addictions issues and to support people without housing, including connecting them to health and social services,” Fraser Health said in a statement. statement.

The province did not respond to a request for comment by the deadline.

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The research highlights the partnership between the UK and Bangladesh in the development of health professionals https://mhwwb.org/the-research-highlights-the-partnership-between-the-uk-and-bangladesh-in-the-development-of-health-professionals/ Sat, 15 Oct 2022 15:58:57 +0000 https://mhwwb.org/the-research-highlights-the-partnership-between-the-uk-and-bangladesh-in-the-development-of-health-professionals/ The British Council organized an event to present the results of the research entitled “Presentation of findings and recommendations and workshop: examples of health partnerships and training of health professionals”. This research is a collaboration between the University of Manchester Tropical Health and Education Trust and IRD Global and funded by the British Council, a […]]]>

The British Council organized an event to present the results of the research entitled “Presentation of findings and recommendations and workshop: examples of health partnerships and training of health professionals”.

This research is a collaboration between the University of Manchester Tropical Health and Education Trust and IRD Global and funded by the British Council, a press release on Saturday said.

The research emphasizes the Bangladeshi government’s drive to professionalise and upskill the health sector and create an opportunity for the UK to support this programme.

The researchers aimed to analyze documents, interviews and observations to explore the extent of competency-based health worker training in Bangladesh as well as the barriers and facilitators to establishing and sustaining health partnerships between health organizations in the UK and Bangladesh.

Speakers also addressed valuable priority recommendations on developing the UK-Bangladesh health alliance through higher education and partnerships, building up resources and funding, increasing public support for nurses as well as strengthening the training of health professionals through international partnerships.

The ceremony was honored by the presence of the main guest, the Minister of Education, Dr. Dipu Moni, Ministry of Education; special guest Md Saiful Hassan Badal, Secretary, Medical Education and Family Welfare Division, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare; Robert Chatterton Dickson, British High Commissioner to Bangladesh; David Maynard, Director of Education, British Council.

In addition, speakers presented the results of their research.

Chief guest Dr Dipu Moni said: “The research came in response to a request from the High Commissioner of Bangladesh in London, Saida Muna Tasneem, for training facilities for our nurses. As we enable them to develop through such an integrated facilitation process, I am sure they will pursue better careers outside of Bangladesh, especially in the UK.

“It has been a great addition to our overall local medical education system, and we look forward to similar partnership opportunities with gratitude to the UK government and institutions,” the Minister added.

Meanwhile, Robert Chatterton Dickson, said: “The UK has always stood with Bangladesh and other countries, ensuring the creation and utilization of development opportunities. The UK and NHS, Health England, University of Manchester, FCDO Health Team and the British Council, as well as Bangladeshi partners and stakeholders such as the Ministry of Health, IRD, CIPRB, have together created a great example of collaboration for the betterment of Bangladesh. health and medical education sector.

“I hope this research will help map how Bangladesh can ensure an improvement in the quality and quantity of the health workforce in the country, and eventually lead to the recognition and accreditation of health qualifications,” said he added.

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Ghana Psychological Association advocates for more funds for training mental health professionals https://mhwwb.org/ghana-psychological-association-advocates-for-more-funds-for-training-mental-health-professionals/ Tue, 11 Oct 2022 11:16:48 +0000 https://mhwwb.org/ghana-psychological-association-advocates-for-more-funds-for-training-mental-health-professionals/ Ghs shows teeth to recalcitrant medical professionals The Ghana Psychological Association (GPA) has called for the allocation of more funds for the training of more mental health professionals and the expansion of mental health facilities.This, the Association said, was necessary to increase access to appropriate and affordable mental health care for every citizen. A statement […]]]>

Ghs shows teeth to recalcitrant medical professionals

The Ghana Psychological Association (GPA) has called for the allocation of more funds for the training of more mental health professionals and the expansion of mental health facilities.
This, the Association said, was necessary to increase access to appropriate and affordable mental health care for every citizen.

A statement signed by Dr Isaac Newman Arthur, National Public Relations Officer of GPA, copied to the Ghana News Agency to mark this year’s World Mental Health Day, said the timely constitution of various guidance governing the promotion of mental health care was essential to ensure smooth implementation. of the various policies and plans needed to effectively manage mental health-related programs.

The theme for this year’s World Mental Health Day is “Making mental health for all a global priority”.
The statement said it was expected that celebrating the Day across the world would spark a unified drive to improve mental health care in every country, for every person on the planet.

He said laws on various mental health issues such as attempted suicide, funding for mental health care (including inclusion of mental health treatment in National Health Insurance) should be reviewed and changes made to reflect current needs and perspectives.

“On World Mental Health Day, GPA encourages its members, citizens of Ghana and people around the world to join in the campaign to promote mental health,” he said.

“People living with mental illness should be treated with respect and dignity, and should receive the mental health care they deserve.”

The statement says that the stigmatization of people with mental illness has no place in a modern world.
“We join our hands and hearts with all other mental health organizations locally and globally to pledge our support for the promotion of appropriate and affordable mental health care around the world.”

He said that every year Ghana loses about 7% ($5 billion) of its Gross Domestic Product (GDP) due to mental disorders, according to the Ghana Mental Health Authority.

He said that globally, mental disorders such as anxiety and depression cost the global economy more than $1 trillion in lost productivity each year.

He said that with a staggering number of over 900 million people worldwide and 3.1 million Ghanaians suffering from some form of mental illness according to the World Health Organization, the need for global action to improve mental health care around the world requires a major second look and intense and consistent global action.
The statement further indicates that more than eight million deaths a year worldwide could be attributed to mental disorders.

He said it was truly a pandemic because in all parts of the world there were increasing numbers of cases of mental disorders, especially in low-income countries.

He said mental health issues were generally underestimated and overlooked, with mental health care being underfunded in many countries.

He said mental disorders, such as depression, accounted for more than 80% of suicide deaths, with more than 700,000 people dying by suicide each year, or one person every 40 seconds.

He said suicide was the fourth leading cause of death among 15-19 year olds, with the majority of them suffering from some form of mental disorder.

Even so, many mental health professionals across the world, including dedicated professionals in Ghana, were breaking down barriers and making giant strides in raising awareness and promoting mental health care in various parts of the world, on various difficult terrains.

The statement indicates that over the past few years, since GPA’s inception in 1996, the Association has been actively involved in empowering its members to develop the skills necessary to provide mental health care to citizens of Ghana, including providing psychological interventions to communities and people affected by various disasters in the country.

He said that through extensive research, advocacy and active participation in various discourses in Ghana, GPA has influenced various policies that emphasize the provision of quality and affordable mental health care in Ghana, including a shift in policy on sensitive issues such as the criminalization of attempted suicide.

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