Health facilities – MHWWB http://mhwwb.org/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 19:35:12 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://mhwwb.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-34-150x150.png Health facilities – MHWWB http://mhwwb.org/ 32 32 LGH’s obligation to provide better health facilities: Zafar https://mhwwb.org/lghs-obligation-to-provide-better-health-facilities-zafar/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 19:35:12 +0000 https://mhwwb.org/lghs-obligation-to-provide-better-health-facilities-zafar/ Postgraduate Medical Institute / Amir-ud-Din Medical College, Head Professor Dr. Sardar Mohammad Al-freed Zafar ordered to renovate the existing building of Lahore General Hospital and hand it over to Nursing Administration for his offices. Speaking at the inaugural ceremony, he said after that, the Deputy Chief Superintendent, Nursing Superintendent and staff would be able to […]]]>

Postgraduate Medical Institute / Amir-ud-Din Medical College, Head Professor Dr. Sardar Mohammad Al-freed Zafar ordered to renovate the existing building of Lahore General Hospital and hand it over to Nursing Administration for his offices.

Speaking at the inaugural ceremony, he said after that, the Deputy Chief Superintendent, Nursing Superintendent and staff would be able to carry out their duties in a pleasant and clean environment and things would be better at home. ‘coming.

On occasion, the additional secretary of the Department of Specialized Health Care and Medical Education Qarat ul Ain, Ramzan Bibi, Mamoona Sattar, Anwar Sultana, the president of the Young Nurses Association Khalida Tabassum and other officials were also present.

Professor Al-freed Zafar said that it is the duty of the institution to provide better treatment facilities in the hospital and better environment for the nurses to manage the wards so that they can perform their duties properly. their functions in the service of suffering humanity.

The director of PGMI said that the administration of the hospital also has a responsibility to show its interest in providing better facilities and accommodations for nurses in the institution so that they can better care for patients with dignity and determination.

He added that a training workshop has been scheduled to further enhance the professional skills of nurses so that they can carry out their duties without any difficulty in dealing with new diseases and emergencies.

He said those associated with the healthcare sector should always adhere to the principles of patience, present-mindedness and discipline. He said that the nursing sector is an important means of collecting prayers and those associated with it are very lucky that the patient is in their hands for a good recovery.

Professor Al-freed Zafar also appreciated the record work done by the nurses in the Corona epidemic which will always be remembered in history when these nurses continued to serve others day and night without worrying about their lives and remained brave without any fear. On this occasion, Khalida Tabassum, President of the Young Nurses Association, thanked Senior Professor Alfreed Zafar on behalf of her community for this important initiative and also assured her of her full support in the future.

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One in ten unmarried women who visited health facilities for various reasons have pelvic organ prolapse in Harari Regional State, eastern Ethiopia | BMC Women’s Health https://mhwwb.org/one-in-ten-unmarried-women-who-visited-health-facilities-for-various-reasons-have-pelvic-organ-prolapse-in-harari-regional-state-eastern-ethiopia-bmc-womens-health/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 14:10:30 +0000 https://mhwwb.org/one-in-ten-unmarried-women-who-visited-health-facilities-for-various-reasons-have-pelvic-organ-prolapse-in-harari-regional-state-eastern-ethiopia-bmc-womens-health/ Ugianskiene A, Davila GW, Su TH, Urogynecology F, Committee PF. FIGO review of statements on the use of synthetic mesh for pelvic organ prolapse and stress urinary incontinence. Int J Gynecol Obstet. 2019;147(2):147–55. Google Scholar article ACo Obstetricians, Gynecologists. Pelvic Organ Prolapse: ACOG Practice Bulletin, Issue 214. Obstet Gynecol. 2019;34(5):e126–42. Google Scholar Rortveit G, Brown […]]]>
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    JS Bank signs an agreement with the IRD to provide health equipment to employees https://mhwwb.org/js-bank-signs-an-agreement-with-the-ird-to-provide-health-equipment-to-employees/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 09:13:12 +0000 https://mhwwb.org/js-bank-signs-an-agreement-with-the-ird-to-provide-health-equipment-to-employees/ JS Bank, one of the fastest growing banks in Pakistan, has partnered with Interactive Research and Development (IRD) to provide free Covid-19 testing services, funded by the Foundation for Innovative New Diagnostics (FIND ), to the bank’s frontline staff through WellCheck, the IRD’s global health and well-being programme. To clarify, IRD is a research and […]]]>

    JS Bank, one of the fastest growing banks in Pakistan, has partnered with Interactive Research and Development (IRD) to provide free Covid-19 testing services, funded by the Foundation for Innovative New Diagnostics (FIND ), to the bank’s frontline staff through WellCheck, the IRD’s global health and well-being programme.

    To clarify, IRD is a research and healthcare delivery organization that creates new healthcare infrastructure, leveraging technology and building the capacity of community stakeholders.

    It provides quality healthcare services in the areas of infectious diseases, non-communicable diseases, and maternal and child health care to underprivileged communities in Pakistan and more than 15 other countries. The IRD WellCheck team has trained health professionals with extensive experience in diagnostic testing, health service delivery and capacity building.

    Read more: JS Bank wins big at the GDEIB Awards 2021

    The signing ceremony was held at the IRD office in Pakistan. Faisal Ismail, Managing Director of Biologica, Bilal Sheikh, Director of Marketing and Synergy for JS Bank Limited, Ahmed Jamil Memon, Director of Administration and CSR, Director of Marketing for JS Bank Limited, Capt(R) Muhammad Habib Khan, Director of Operations Officer, IRD Pakistan, and other senior officials were present on the occasion.

    Speaking on the occasion, Bilal Sheikh mentioned that the partnership was a commitment to maintaining employee safety and prioritizing employee health to reduce the spread of Covid-19 through quality healthcare facilities. by the IRD as part of their Well check program.

    JS Bank committed to its employees

    It should be mentioned that this is not the first time that JS Bank has taken such an initiative. Last year, during the peak of Covid, he worked with the Sindh government and launched a vaccination campaign for team members and their families.

    The three-day vaccination campaign took place at JS Bank’s head office at Shaheen Commercial Complex and covered front and back-end members and their relatives. The activity was a resounding success with long lines of people lining up for vaccination and was well received by everyone.

    Read more: JS Bank partners with Almas Jewelers for easy gold valuation

    The family members of JS Bank appreciated that the Bank undertook this vaccination program and were grateful to the Sindh government for facilitating the smooth process.

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    269 ​​attacks on health facilities in 100 days since Russia invaded Ukraine https://mhwwb.org/269-attacks-on-health-facilities-in-100-days-since-russia-invaded-ukraine/ Fri, 03 Jun 2022 12:46:00 +0000 https://mhwwb.org/269-attacks-on-health-facilities-in-100-days-since-russia-invaded-ukraine/ More than 260 attacks have now taken place against health facilities in Ukraine and staff are working “on a knife edge”, the World Health Organization (WHO) has said. Marking 100 days since Russia invaded Ukraine, the WHO said the health system across the country continues to be “under severe pressure”. As of Thursday, they have […]]]>

    More than 260 attacks have now taken place against health facilities in Ukraine and staff are working “on a knife edge”, the World Health Organization (WHO) has said.

    Marking 100 days since Russia invaded Ukraine, the WHO said the health system across the country continues to be “under severe pressure”. As of Thursday, they have verified 269 attacks on health facilities, killing at least 76 people and injuring 59.

    They warned that some health care buildings have been destroyed and others are now “overwhelmed” with people suffering from trauma as well as injuries as a direct result of the war.

    Healthcare workers in Ukraine collect blood donations in a bunker. Photo: WHO Newsroom” title=”Healthcare workers in Ukraine collect blood donations in a bunker. Photo: WHO Newsroom” class=”card-img”/>
    Healthcare workers in Ukraine collect blood donations in a bunker. Photo: WHO Newsroom

    In the eastern city of Kharkiev, hospitals transferred patients to underground bomb shelters on February 24 and are still treating them there, deep underground.

    Hospital beds and operating rooms have all been moved.

    “There is even a fully functioning blood bank where townspeople come every day to donate blood to keep life flowing in the veins of their fellow citizens injured by the explosions that keep health workers in the basement,” said said the WHO.

    The town’s children’s hospital was destroyed by a cluster bomb. The director told the WHO that they still could not allow the children into the hospital playground as they were still finding shrapnel from that bomb.

    Shrapnel is recovered from a playground outside a children's hospital in Ukraine.  Photo: WHO Newsroom
    Shrapnel is recovered from a playground outside a children’s hospital in Ukraine. Photo: WHO Newsroom

    WHO Director-General Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said: “This war has been going on for 100 days too long, shattering lives and communities and jeopardizing the short and long-term health of the Ukrainian people.” He called on the Russian Federation to end the war.

    WHO Regional Director for Europe, Dr Hans Henri P Kluge, said: “These attacks are not justifiable, they are never OK and they must be investigated. No medical professional should have to provide healthcare on the edge, but that is exactly what nurses, doctors, paramedics, medical teams in Ukraine are doing.

    The WHO reaffirmed its commitment to stay in the war-torn area for the long term.

    “Across the country, healthcare professionals report that the most common request now is for help with insomnia, anxiety, grief and psychological pain,” the WHO said.

    They again appealed for funding, asking for $147.5 million (€137 million) for immediate medical support and long-term recovery. Of this amount, $67.5 million (€62 million) will go to countries hosting large numbers of refugees, including Poland, Moldova, Romana and the Czech Republic.

    Medical supplies entering Ukraine include ambulances, trauma surgery supplies, power generators and oxygen equipment. The funding also supports the construction of oxygen plants to help hospitals operate autonomously and Ukrainian-made ventilators that can operate independently during power outages.

    More than 1,300 local staff have also been trained in trauma surgery, mass casualties, burns and how to deal with chemically exposed patients.

    Ukrainians with chronic illnesses or facing Covid-19 infection also need help, with the Ukrainian Public Health Center now working with the WHO to rebuild laboratory diagnostic systems and vaccination programs.

    Ireland has sent medical aid to Ukraine supporting the WHO fund, as well as direct aid, including ambulances delivered through the charity project Medical Help Ukraine, part of the Association of Ukrainians from the Republic of Ireland.

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    Anthem Partners with Northern Light Health Facilities https://mhwwb.org/anthem-partners-with-northern-light-health-facilities/ Wed, 01 Jun 2022 20:20:00 +0000 https://mhwwb.org/anthem-partners-with-northern-light-health-facilities/ The move allows Anthem members to access hospitals with lower cost options and incentives. SOUTH PORTLAND, Maine – Two Northern Light Health hospitals will soon offer potentially lower copayments for many services after partnering with Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield to become Tier 1 providers. Northern Light Inland Hospital in Waterville and Northern Light […]]]>

    The move allows Anthem members to access hospitals with lower cost options and incentives.

    SOUTH PORTLAND, Maine – Two Northern Light Health hospitals will soon offer potentially lower copayments for many services after partnering with Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield to become Tier 1 providers.

    Northern Light Inland Hospital in Waterville and Northern Light Mercy Hospital in Portland will become Tier 1 providers in Anthem’s HMO tiered option plans in Maine.

    The move “guarantees quality and affordability,” according to a joint press release from Northern Light Health and Anthem. Anthem’s Maine HMO tiered option plans are available to members of individual, small group, and large group health plans.

    The release notes that Anthem members have access to healthcare professionals and hospitals with lower-cost options and incentives under Anthem’s HMO tiered option plans in Maine.

    Anthem and Northern Light Health said in the release that by selecting a Tier 1 healthcare professional or hospital, members “could see significant cost-sharing savings for healthcare services – such as lower copays for primary care physician and specialist visits, lower coinsurance costs, and up to $3,000 in deductible savings, depending on the plan.”

    With the addition of Northern Light Inland Hospital and Northern Light Mercy Hospital on July 1, 2022, Northern Light Health’s 10 hospitals and healthcare professionals will be included in the top tier option plans at several HMO levels of Anthem in Maine.

    The move comes as some Maine hospitals and medical practices announce they will stop accepting Anthem for network coverage. Some of the problems relate to hospital systems that do not receive payments. MaineHealth, the parent company that operates Maine Medical Center in Portland, said its hospital system at one point owed about $70 million.

    Other firms are reporting contractual disputes with Anthem regarding how much the firm should charge for certain services. In May, Coastal Women’s Healthcare, the state’s largest independent OB/GYN firm, said it would drop the insurance company in August 2022. President Dr. Barbara Slager said Anthem was paying CWH “half” of what other comparable firms received. . She said about 38% of CWH patients have Anthem. Slager added that Anthem used this high percentage as leverage to offer low payout rates, knowing that if CWH did not renew the contract, it could eventually go bankrupt.

    Asked about the lack of payments, Suzanne Spruce, director of communications for Northern Light Health, said in an email:

    “We continue to experience delays with out-of-state and Medicare Advantage claims, and we are still meeting monthly with Anthem to review outstanding issues,” Spruce wrote. Northern Light Health is excited to work with other Maine healthcare providers participating in this network. »

    According to Gov. Janet Mills’ office, Anthem is Maine’s largest insurer, covering 300,000 people. Maine state employees and tens of thousands of other public service employees have Anthem for their health insurance.

    “Northern Light Health is pleased to accept Anthem’s invitation for our Portland and Waterville facilities to join Tier 1 for their Maine HMO Tiered Option Plans,” said President and Chief Executive Officer. management, Timothy Dentry, in the release. “The inclusion of Northern Light Mercy Hospital and Northern Light Inland Hospital will expand access to affordable, high-quality health care, and we are excited to work with other Maine health care providers participating in this network. This will help ensure the best possible care for Maine residents.

    “We are committed to providing access to quality, outcome-based health care, and our partnership with Northern Light Health will expand the affordable care options available to Maine health care consumers in the southern part of the state,” said Denise McDonough, president of Anthem Blue. Cross and Blue Shield in Maine in the release. “We know Maine consumers want quality, access and choice, and we’re excited to continue working with Northern Light Health on our shared goal of protecting health care affordability for Mainers.”

    More articles about NEWS CENTER Maine

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    Illegal health establishments: One of them even served as embassies https://mhwwb.org/illegal-health-establishments-one-of-them-even-served-as-embassies/ Sun, 29 May 2022 02:00:00 +0000 https://mhwwb.org/illegal-health-establishments-one-of-them-even-served-as-embassies/ Located in the upscale district of the capital, Baridhara, Wahab Medical Practice carries out medical assessments of people traveling to Western countries, its website says. The US and Australian Embassies list this clinic on their websites as an approved health facility where individuals can obtain their medical evaluations required for visa applications. For all the […]]]>

    Located in the upscale district of the capital, Baridhara, Wahab Medical Practice carries out medical assessments of people traveling to Western countries, its website says.

    The US and Australian Embassies list this clinic on their websites as an approved health facility where individuals can obtain their medical evaluations required for visa applications.

    For all the latest news, follow the Daily Star’s Google News channel.

    The clinic’s website says it has been in business for nearly 30 years.

    But it was found neither in the government’s list of approved hospitals nor in the list of hospitals with pending approval requests.

    Officials said the facility had no permission from the health directorate and only yesterday applied for a license from the directorate.

    Despite repeated attempts, The Daily Star was unable to reach the heights of Wahab Medical Practice.

    On Wednesday, the DGHS in a meeting decided to close all unauthorized health establishments by yesterday afternoon.

    Last night, 44 establishments requested authorization from the General Directorate of Health Services (DGHS).

    Officials said several unauthorized health facilities were closed yesterday in all districts across the country.

    DGHS plans to hold a press conference today on the nationwide crackdown on unauthorized private health organizations.

    “We wanted to give everyone a strict message. The 72-hour ultimatum worked very well; they [owners of unauthorised facilities] are leaking,” Professor Ahmedul Kabir, the additional director general of the DGHS, told the Daily Star yesterday.

    The DGHS said it is cracking down on healthcare facilities that have not even applied for registration or renewal of expired licenses.

    The deadline for applying for license renewal was yesterday afternoon.

    Health officials began running the nationwide campaign since Thursday. In many districts, those in charge of unauthorized facilities have suspended their services and fled.

    “We closed down three establishments, which had no license, and issued an ultimatum to three others to renew their license. But many more fled as soon as they saw us,” Awliad said. Hossain, head of health and family planning at Chuadanga Sadar.

    Health officials in Natore closed eight unauthorized private health organizations yesterday, our correspondent reports.

    Facilities include Central Diagnostic Center Padma Clinic, Prime Diagnostic Center, Tamanna Digital Diagnostic Center, Medina Eye Hospital, Phaco Eye Clinic and Center, and Patient Diagnosis and Consultation Center. Health care.

    According to the Natore Civil Surgeon’s Office, there are about 40 out of 200 unauthorized private health facilities in the district.

    Yesterday, Tangail health officials shut down three healthcare organizations and fined three others, our correspondent reports.

    According to the Tangail Civil Surgeon Office, a total of 181 out of about 300 private clinics and hospitals in the district were unlicensed.

    Under the Medical Practice and Private Clinics and Laboratories (Regulations) Order 1982, private healthcare providers must be licensed by the DGHS.

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    Ajit Pawar – Punekar News https://mhwwb.org/ajit-pawar-punekar-news/ Fri, 27 May 2022 11:26:57 +0000 https://mhwwb.org/ajit-pawar-punekar-news/ Pune, 27th May 2022: “Equipment procured under the Primary Health Center Gap Analysis Program will make the Pune District Health Service efficient,” Deputy Chief Minister Ajit Pawar said. is said to be confident that this “Pune model” of health facilities in rural areas would become popular in the state. Pawar inspected the display of equipment […]]]>

    Pune, 27th May 2022: “Equipment procured under the Primary Health Center Gap Analysis Program will make the Pune District Health Service efficient,” Deputy Chief Minister Ajit Pawar said. is said to be confident that this “Pune model” of health facilities in rural areas would become popular in the state.

    Pawar inspected the display of equipment procured under the ‘Gap Analysis’ program for Primary Health Centers (PHCs) in Pune district of Vidhan Bhavan. The exhibition featured 252 types of health-related materials. Zilla Parishad (ZP) Chief Executive Ayush Prasad, Additional Chief Executive Bharat Shendge and District Health Officer Dr. Bhagwan Pawar attended the occasion.

    MP CM Pawar said the equipment needed for health care was purchased from funds from Zilla Parishad, aid provided by social organisations, the sector’s corporate social responsibility (CSR) fund industry. This will enable local delivery of modern treatments in rural areas and provide better health care to the poor. This effort to activate the health system in the district is commendable. Medical treatment requires advanced equipment, as well as specialized doctors and health workers. A proposal has been sent to the Department of Rural Development to provide the necessary manpower for the primary health center and a follow-up is underway, he said.

    https://bit.ly/Punekarnews1JEE

    “The government is doing its best to maintain the health of citizens in the rural areas of the district. Citizens should take advantage of these facilities,” Pawar said.

    He added, “All officers and staff at Zilla Parishad had done a good job during the Corona pandemic period. Service to patients should be seen as human service, service to God. It should be noted that medical care is less of a business than a service. The Corona crisis has made the country aware of the importance of the infrastructure needed for healthcare.

    Read also Pune: Parking fees near Katraj Dairy imposed arbitrarily; Commuters face problems

    Primary Health Center Enabling Facilities

    Nine private companies have provided CSR funds of Rs 17 crore 60 lakhs for strengthening primary health centers, of which a total of 102 primary health centers have been strengthened. Rs 4 crore 25 lakh has been provided by Zilla Parishad Swanidhi, of which 54 health centers have been strengthened. A “service gap analysis” of the primary health center was carried out for necessary repairs through the district planning committee. As a result, Rs. 4 crore 89 lakhs was received from the committee of which 48 primary health centers were strengthened.

    Also Read IISER Pune Obtains National Facility for Gene Function in Health and Disease

    Inauguration of the Zilla Parishad application

    MP CM Pawar inaugurated ‘My Zilla Parishad-My Rights’ app which was designed to bring transparency in work given to educated unemployed and trade unions on 10 lakh jobs created by Zilla Parishad and to raise awareness among ordinary citizens at the work of Zilla Parishad.

    The booklets “Gram Panchayat Training” and “Divisional Inquiry Manual” prepared by the Gram Panchayat Training Center were also published by the Deputy Chief Minister.

    Managing Director Ayush Prasad briefed on the work done by Zilla Parishad.

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    WHO assembly denounces Russian attacks on Ukrainian health facilities https://mhwwb.org/who-assembly-denounces-russian-attacks-on-ukrainian-health-facilities/ Thu, 26 May 2022 17:42:11 +0000 https://mhwwb.org/who-assembly-denounces-russian-attacks-on-ukrainian-health-facilities/ Published on: 05/26/2022 – 19:42 Geneva (AFP) – WHO member states strongly condemned Russia’s war in Ukraine and attacks on health facilities in a resolution passed overwhelmingly on Thursday, further isolating Moscow in the international arena. The resolution was passed 88 to 12 at the World Health Organization’s annual meeting, while a Russian counter-resolution on […]]]>

    Published on:

    Geneva (AFP) – WHO member states strongly condemned Russia’s war in Ukraine and attacks on health facilities in a resolution passed overwhelmingly on Thursday, further isolating Moscow in the international arena.

    The resolution was passed 88 to 12 at the World Health Organization’s annual meeting, while a Russian counter-resolution on the health crisis in Ukraine – making no mention of its invasion – fell flat.

    The result “sends a clear signal to the Russian Federation: stop your war against Ukraine. Stop attacks on hospitals,” Ukrainian Ambassador Yevheniia Filipenko said.

    “The World Health Assembly has confirmed that the responsibility for the health crisis in Ukraine lies exclusively with the Russian Federation,” Filipenko said.

    The adopted resolution says it “condemns in the strongest terms” “Russia’s military aggression against Ukraine, including attacks on health facilities.”

    He urged Russia to “immediately cease all attacks on hospitals” and other healthcare sites.

    The resolution was sponsored by Ukraine and co-sponsored by nations including the United States, Britain, Japan, Turkey and European Union countries.

    Of the 194 Member States of the WHO, 183 had the right to vote. Eighty-eight votes for and 12 against, with 53 abstentions and 30 countries absent.

    The resolution said the war was seriously hampering access to healthcare in Ukraine and had wider health implications in the region.

    He urged Russia to respect and protect all medical and humanitarian personnel as well as the sick and injured, in accordance with international law.

    The resolution also called for safe, rapid and unimpeded access to people in need, as well as the free flow of essential medicines and equipment.

    Diplomatic isolation

    The WHO has verified 256 separate attacks on healthcare in Ukraine since the February 24 Russian invasion. The WHO said 75 people died and 59 were injured.

    He said 212 attacks involved heavy weapons.

    WHO Emergency Director Michael Ryan said he hoped other agencies would use the verified information and “take the necessary steps for any criminal investigation required”.

    Since the invasion, Ukraine and its allies have tried to maximize Russia’s diplomatic isolation, including within the United Nations.

    The World Health Assembly is the annual gathering of WHO member states and serves as the decision-making body of the United Nations health agency.

    The Russian resolution on the health crisis in war-torn Ukraine – which made no reference to the full-scale invasion – was defeated by 66 votes to 15, with 70 abstentions.

    Russian Deputy Ambassador Alexander Alimov rejected the result.

    “Any attempt to isolate or blame the Russian Federation specifically for the health situation in the country is unacceptable,” he said.

    “Russia brings peace to Ukraine,” he insisted.

    ‘Genocide’

    French Ambassador Jérôme Bonnafont, speaking on behalf of the EU, called the failure of the Russian resolution a “cynical attempt to distort the facts”.

    His text took over and copied large chunks of the Ukrainian resolution – while removing any mention of Russia.

    “The one thing they haven’t taken on is responsibility for the health emergency that they alone are causing,” US Ambassador Sheba Crocker said.

    “Russia is asking you to look away from the horrific reality…this is wanton destruction of health care, services and life for purely political purposes, justified on the basis of lies and misinformation. “

    Polish Ambassador Zbigniew Czech said: “Let’s be honest: what we are witnessing in Ukraine is genocide.

    The representative of China said: “The integrity and sovereignty of all countries, including Ukraine, must be respected… It is in no one’s interest to continue hostilities.”

    WHO chief Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus has repeatedly called on Moscow to stop the war.

    Russia asked Tedros “to come in person to learn more about Russia’s efforts to resolve the health and humanitarian crisis.”

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    Virginia official says staff are leaving mental health facilities to work at Chick-fil-A https://mhwwb.org/virginia-official-says-staff-are-leaving-mental-health-facilities-to-work-at-chick-fil-a/ Wed, 25 May 2022 11:05:00 +0000 https://mhwwb.org/virginia-official-says-staff-are-leaving-mental-health-facilities-to-work-at-chick-fil-a/ At a meeting last week, Virginia Health and Human Resources Secretary John Littel made a telling remark about the state’s understaffed and overburdened mental health facilities. “We’re losing a lot of people to Chick-fil-A,” Littel told the General Assembly Joint Committee on Health Care. “And hopefully the budget will help with that.” Staffing issues at […]]]>

    At a meeting last week, Virginia Health and Human Resources Secretary John Littel made a telling remark about the state’s understaffed and overburdened mental health facilities.

    “We’re losing a lot of people to Chick-fil-A,” Littel told the General Assembly Joint Committee on Health Care. “And hopefully the budget will help with that.”

    Staffing issues at Virginia mental health facilities are no secret, but Littel’s comment emerged as a stark anecdote about the dire working conditions of some state employees who help with the crucial societal task of caring for the mentally ill.

    In an interview on Tuesday, Littel, an appointee of Governor Glenn Youngkin and a former executive at health care company Magellan, said broader worker shortages have allowed the fast-food industry and… others to provide more attractive jobs for state mental health workers who have had to report to relatively low-paying and difficult jobs “throughout the pandemic.”

    “Part of it is that some of these people are paid less than you could get at fast food or Target or Walmart or something like that. And it’s not as stressful,” Littel said, adding that state mental health workers “do life-saving work every day.”

    He said he was primarily referring to workers who can work in housekeeping or direct support staff positions and who could earn around $13 to $18 an hour. Virginia’s recent job postings for Chick-fil-A, which advertises that all workers get Sundays off when its restaurants are closed, offered similar pay, with some places offering a starting salary of $15 from the hour.

    LEARN MORE ON VIRGINIAMERCURY.COM >

    .(Virginia Mercury)

    The Virginia Mercury is a nonprofit, nonpartisan news organization covering Virginia government and politics.

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    “Regulating health facilities for safe and quality treatment” https://mhwwb.org/regulating-health-facilities-for-safe-and-quality-treatment/ Sun, 22 May 2022 01:00:00 +0000 https://mhwwb.org/regulating-health-facilities-for-safe-and-quality-treatment/ LAHORE: Providing people with quality health care has been a challenge. It is imperative to regulate the health facilities available under an authoritarian system. The population has already increased enormously. If left unchecked, it will be more difficult to make the health system work in the near future. These views were expressed by speakers during […]]]>

    LAHORE: Providing people with quality health care has been a challenge. It is imperative to regulate the health facilities available under an authoritarian system. The population has already increased enormously. If left unchecked, it will be more difficult to make the health system work in the near future.

    These views were expressed by speakers during a panel discussion jointly organized by the Punjab Healthcare Commission (PHC) and the Mir Khalil-ur-Rahman Memorial Society MKRMS (Jang Group of Newspapers) on the issue “The quality and treatment safety are the first priority of the Punjab Health Care Commission.

    The speakers were of the opinion that the Punjab Health Care Commission was established to curb the growing cases of neglect, mismanagement and irregularities in treatment and health services as the situation demanded the establishment of an independent and competent body at the provincial level. It was absolutely necessary to establish minimum standards for health services for non-governmental clinics and to ensure their proper implementation.

    At the same time, it was important to devise effective strategies against unqualified doctors and nurses to protect their patients from disability, paralysis and physical handicaps or death, the speakers said.

    The special guest of the function was MPA Khawaja Salman Rafique. Opening remarks were made by Dr. Muhammad Saqib Aziz, Chief Executive Officer, Punjab Healthcare Commission. Distinguished guests included former Chairman of the Board of Commissioners of the Punjab Health Care Commission, Prof. Dr Atiya Mubarak, Vice Chancellor of King Edward Medical University, Prof. Dr Khalid Masood Gondal, Former Vice Chancellor of the University of Health Sciences, Prof. Dr. Mahmood Shaukat, Prof. Dr. Saeed Qazi, Vice President. -Chancellor Fatima Jinnah University of Medicine. Prof Dr Amir Zaman Khan, CEO Punjab Health Initiative Management Company Dr Ali Razzaq, Principal SIMS Prof Dr Muhammad Farooq Afzal, Prof Dr Riaz Ahmed Tasneem, Director of Gynecology Sims Prof Dr Tayyaba, Executive Director Punjab Institute of Cardiology Prof Dr Bilal Mohi, Prof Dr Zahid Bashir, Principal, Shalimar Medical and Dental College, Prof Dr Mahmood Ayaz, Former Director, SIMS, Prof Dr Faisal Dar, Dean, Pakistan Kidney and Liver Institute, Prof Dr Amir Mufti, President, MS Services Hospital, Prof Dr Ashraf Nizami , President, PMA Academy of Family Physicians, Dr Tariq Mian, Director of Clinical Governance and Organizational Standards Punjab Healthcare Commission Dr Mushtaq Ahmed Silharia, Dr Jamshed Ahmed (WHO Punjab), Dr Javed Hayat Khan (PKLI), Dean Institute of Public Health Prof Dr Zarfshan Tahir and Provincial Urban Health Specialist UNICEF Punjab Dr Mushtaq Ahmed Shad.

    Khawaja Salman Rafique, addressing the rally, said: “We have to move forward with confidence. We are happy to see the doctors, nurses, paramedics and medical staff doing their duty. We still have work to do and we must move forward. We will also seek advice from senior medical teachers and specialists in your undergraduate and postgraduate program, as technically you need to guide us.

    Punjab Health Care Commission Dr Muhammad Saqib Aziz said teaching medical ethics to all doctors and staff is imperative for safe and quality treatment.

    He gave examples of specialist treatment of doctors in various reputed hospitals without the required academic qualifications which is against all the prevailing rules and regulations of the Medical Commission of Pakistan.

    Dr Mushtaq Ahmed Suhlaria gave a presentation on minimum facilities for primary health care and safe treatment. He explained the international rules and standards.

    Professor Dr Khalid Masood Gondal said the Punjab Health Care Commission was doing positive work. Prof Dr Faisal Dar in his address said that this roundtable was organized on a very good topic. He said the World Health Organization has given the best definition of health care. We must think about repairing the hospital system. Every hospital should have quality care departments and service delivery should be further improved for which development should be done in phases, he said. Professor Dr Masood Sadiq said: “If we are talking about a regulatory body, we have to see its role all over the world. There should be regulation in hospitals as well.

    He said that the role of the Punjab Health Care Commission has been greatly enhanced, although its function should only be the regulation of treatment in hospitals.

    Professor Tayyaba Waseem said that during the conference patient safety and quality of care were discussed which is best practice. All the blame should not be placed on nurses and doctors. There is also some patient involvement in this process. If we look at foreign countries, we see a limited number of patients there, so patients are not seen, whereas in our country this is not the case. It is said that there are two or three patients in a bed, but you look at the fact that we do not refuse incoming patients and that we do not treat them. We must strictly enforce population control, if the population continues to grow at this rate. In the days to come, the situation will get worse. If we work on population control, many of our problems will be solved.

    Professor Dr Mahmood Ayaz said every patient is important. Professor Saeed Qazi said quality will only come when quantity is less. We need to improve the quality, he said.

    Professor Dr Amir Zaman said that over the past ten years since PHC was established, the standard treatment has improved a lot but there is always room for improvement. He said now units have been set up in hospitals for quality. Professor Nadeem Hayat Malik said having SSP is a positive process. Prof. Dr. Atiya Mubarak said that PHC is an excellent institution, but there are some problems such as lack of staff and low budget.

    Professor Farooq Afzal said there are four important aspects of values-based health. Patient safety is discussed in this seminar which is a process of improvement. We need to work on education in this regard, he said.

    Professor Dr. Mahmood Shaukat said that success is only achieved by following the truth. We have to stop copying others. The health policy must be formulated for three or five years and must be worked on, he said. Professor Riaz Ahmad Tasneem said things had to be controlled from the start.

    We shouldn’t take them to the level where they need to be fixed later. There are more complaints about public hospitals, he said.

    Dr. Amir Mufti said: “Every time a patient comes to us, we explain it to him and he is fully satisfied in any case.” Professor Dr Ashraf Nizami said, “We should look at the realities on the ground and at the same time talk about technical consultation. Dr Ali Razzaq said, “At present, we have 788 public and private hospitals registered and we are now working on quality care.

    Dr Zahid Bashir said the system needed to be reviewed. Hospitals and institutions need to monitor their staff. Dr Huma Rashid said: “We have to make decisions that reduce the problems. We also need to talk about cutting costs and embracing digitization to minimize the burden of paperwork. Speaking on the occasion, Wasif Nagi said that PHC is an independent body whose main objective is to improve and preserve the minimum standard of health service delivery in government and non-government health centers and clinics. .

    Professor Zarfshan Tahir said training on minimum standards of healthcare is very important. Their quality must be ensured and all this must be done in collaboration with any institution. The Health Commission has signed a memorandum of understanding with us. We will provide training to them from our platform to improve the quality of training, she said.

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